11
Silver Chains and
Friendly Giants

BY THE LATTER HALF of the 1920s, there was a growing confidence that business had shaken off the shackles of public distrust, that a gospel of unfettered commercial enterprise--condemned throughout the Progressive period--had reclaimed the faith of the American public. "Public opinion is no longer inclined to be unfavorable to the large business merger," announced Edward L. Bernays in 1928, a year in which corporate combinations were escalating. "In the opinion of millions," Bernays related, "mergers and trusts" were now understood as "friendly giants and not ogres." This welcome turn of events, he explained deterministically, could be directly attributed to the maturation of public relations techniques, "to the deliberate use of propaganda in its broadest sense." 1

To some extent Bernays's reading of the situation was valid. Throughout the twenties, a growing array of large businesses were disseminating "canned" news and editorial columns to thousands of newspapers across the United States. To E. Hofer, who ran the country's largest distributor of such materials, these items were calculated to uphold the canon of laissez-faire capitalism, to reduce "the volume of legislation that interferes with business and industry . . . to minimize and counteract political regulation of business . . . to discourage radicalism by labor organizations," to argue for "reasonable taxation" of business income, and to "campaign against all socialistic propaganda of whatever nature." 2 Correspondingly throughout the twenties, many large corporations methodically infiltrated national and local organizations--Chambers of Commerce, farmers' groups,

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
PR! A Social History of Spin
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 480

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.