Costa Rica: Quest for Democracy

By John A. Booth | Go to book overview

Institutions and shared norms appear to work together to restrain elites with antidemocratic impulses.


NOTES
1
See, for instance, Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba, The Civic Culture ( Princeton: PrincetonUniversity Press, 1963); Ronald Inglehart, Culture Shift in Advanced Industrial Society ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990); Larry Diamond, "Introduction: Political Culture and Democracy", in Larry Diamond, ed., Political Culture and Democracy in Developing Countries ( Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993), pp. 1-33.
2
Michael Burton, Richard Gunther, and John Higley, "Elite Transformation and Democratic Regimes", in John Higley and Richard Gunther, eds., Elites and Democratic Consolidation in Latin America and Southern Europe ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992); Mitchell A. Seligson and John A. Booth, "Political Culture and Regime Type: Evidence from Nicaragua and Costa Rica", Journal of Politics 55 ( August 1993): 777-792; and John A. Booth and Mitchell A. Seligson, "Paths to Democracy and the Political Culture of Costa Rica, Mexico, and Nicaragua", in Diamond, Political Culture and Democracy, pp. 107-138.
3
Edward N. Muller and Mitchell A. Seligson, "Civic Culture and Democracy: The Question of Causal Relationships", American Political Science Review 88 ( September 1994): 645-652.
4
Guillermo A. O'Donnell, Modernization and Bureaucratic Authoritarianism ( Berkeley: Institute of International Studies, University of California, 1973).
5
Glen C.Dealy, "Tradition of Monistic Democracy in Latin America", in Howard J. Wiarda , ed., Politics and Social Change in Latin America: The Distinct Tradition (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1974), p. 73.
6
Howard J. Wiarda, "Social Change and Political Development in Latin America: Summary, Implications, Frontiers", in Wiarda, Politics and Social Change in Latin America, pp. 269-270, 274. Wiarda's pessimism about democracy in Latin America has diminished somewhat more recently; see Howard J. Wiarda, The Democratic Revolution in Latin America (New York: Holmes and Meier, 1990.)
7
Ronald Inglehart, "The Renaissance of Political Culture". American Political Science Review 82 ( November 1988): 1203-1230; and Inglehart, Culture Shift.
8
John A. Booth and Mitchell A. Seligson, "The Political Culture of Authoritarianism in Mexico," Latin American Research Review 19, 1 ( 1984): 106-124; Booth and Seligson, "Paths to Democracy"; and Seligson and Booth, "Political Culture and Regime Type."
9
Martha Honey, Hostile Acts: U.S. Policy in Costa Rica in the 1980s (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1994), p. 8.
11
Richard Biesanz, Karen Zubris Biesanz, and Mavis Hiltunen Biesanz, The Costa Ricans ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1982), p. 188.
13
Although Catholics and Protestants reported similar levels of religious fundamentalism and frequency of prayer, Protestants reported far higher levels of church attendance.
14
John A. Booth and Patricia Bayer Richard, "Repression, Participation, and Democratic Norms in Urban Central America," American Journal of Political Science 40 ( November 1996): 1205-1232; see table 5.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Costa Rica: Quest for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Acronyms xvii
  • Preface xxi
  • 1 - Latin American Democracy and Costa Rica 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - Contemporary Costa Rica In Central America 17
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - The Historical Development of Costa Rican Democracy 32
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - The Political Framework of Democracy 56
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - Social Structure and Civil Society 82
  • Notes 100
  • 6 - Political Participation 103
  • Notes 125
  • 7 - Political Culture 129
  • Notes 151
  • 8 - Political Economy in Transition 154
  • Notes 174
  • 9 - Costa Rica in the World 177
  • Conclusions 192
  • 10 - Analysi5 and Conclusions: Can Democracy Survive? 195
  • Notes 208
  • Appendix 211
  • Index 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.