The Account: Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's Relación

By Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca; Martin A. Favata et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

During Spain's process of exploration and conquest in the Western Hemisphere, the chronicle, a traditional genre in Spanish literature, continued to be written by the participants in this enterprise. Many of these men were neither learned scholars nor creators of beauty; yet their chronicles are filled with creative power as well as valuable information.

Among these men was Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, the first Spaniard to traverse--on foot--a large portion of the recently discovered territory of North America. His journey ( 1528-1536) predates the expeditions of De Soto and of Coronado in what was later to be the United States. Cabeza de Vaca's odyssey of hardship and misfortune is one of the most remarkable in the history of the New World.

Cabeza de Vaca's journey resonated in history in several important ways. The mention of two advanced Indian cultures and possible riches to the North promoted two subsequent journeys. Soon after arriving in Mexico, Estevanico, a black man and one of the four survivors in Cabeza de Vaca's party, served as guide to Fray Marcos de Niza in a journey northward in search of the mythical Seven Cities of Cíbola. This led to the expedition of Francisco Vázquez de Coronado through what is now the Southwestern United States in 1540.

A product of Cabeza de Vaca odyssey was La Relación (The Account), first published in Zamora, Spain, in 1542, with a second edition published in Valladolid, Spain, in 1555. The Relación, one of the earliest accounts of Spanish penetration in North America, is a document of inestimable value for students of history and literature, ethnographers, anthropologists and the general reader. It contains many first descriptions of the lands and their inhabitants. Furthermore, it is one of first Spanish accounts that calls for a compassionate and tolerant policy toward the natives of the Western Hemisphere.

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca was born around 1490 in Jerez de la Frontera, the Andalusian town now famous for its sherry wine. He was the fourth son of Francisco de Vera, an alderman of Jerez, and Teresa Cabeza de Vaca. His paternal grandfather was Pedro de Vera Mendoza, conqueror of the Ca-

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Account: Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca's Relación
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 156

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.