The Military Revolution Debate: Readings on the Military Transformation of Early Modern Europe

By Clifford J. Rogers | Go to book overview

The nature of the 'military revolution' thesis also poses a problem. Parker, and especially Roberts, link broad military and societal change to changes in tactics and military technology and argue that these were both revolutionary and innovative. The problem is, as ever, one of terms. Not only is revolution a tricky concept, but clearly many tactical developments were hardly innovative in the sense of being truly original. The use of dragoons in the Thirty Years War, for example, was little different from the use of mounted infantry in India and elsewhere in the late-eighteenth century. Equally, the Spanish system of colonial defence based on fortresses and local militia mirrors the efforts of many European states to organize for defence at the beginning of the seventeenth century, for example German states such as Nassau. What was really going on in large part was the clever adaptation of existing ideas to suit local circumstances. While at the micro level these changes in tactics could bring revolutionary results, in the sense of decisive local victories, it is difficult to link these together at the macro level into some all-embracing theory of revolutionary change. These changes have to be distinguished from truly original innovations, such as the flintlock and the socket bayonet, which altered the parameters of conflict.

On sea as on land the military capability of the European powers was far from static in the period 1660-1792. There is still much work required on the age, but it is already clear that, in order to assess both the 'Roberts century' and the Revolutionary/Napoleonic period it is essential to consider the intervening years. Doing so on the global scale underlines their importance.


Notes

I would like to thank Matthew Anderson, Michael Hill, Geoffrey Parker, John Plowright, Cliff Rogers and Peter Wilson for their comments on earlier drafts of this chapter.

1.
H. E. Bodeker and E. Hinrichs (eds.), Alteuropa-ancien régime-Fréhe Neuzeit. Probleme und Methoden der Forschung ( Stuttgart, 1991), pp. 11-50.
2.
A good recent summary is offered by W. Doyle, The Old European Order 1660-1800 ( Oxford, 1978), pp. 295-6.
3.
J. M. Black, 'ancien régime and Enlightenment', European History Quarterly 22, ( 1992), pp. 247-55.
4.
On tactical changes, B. Nosworthy, The Anatomy of Victory. Battle Tactics 1689-1763 ( New York, 1990). On the French navy see most recently, G. Symcox, ' "The Navy of Louis XIV"', in P. Sonnino (ed.), The Reign of Louis XIV (Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, 1990), pp. 127-42 and Philippe de Villette-Mursay, Mes Campagnes de Mer sous Louis XIV avec Un Dictionnaire des personnages et des batailles edited by M. Verge-Franceschi ( Paris, 1991).
5.
D. Loades, The Tudor Navy ( Aldershot, 1992); K. R. Andrews, Ships, Money and Politics. Seafaring and naval enterprise in the reign of Charles I ( Cambridge, 1991); M. Duffy, "The Foundations of British Naval Power",' in Duffy (ed.), The Military Revolution and the State 1500-1800 ( Exeter, 1980), pp. 49-85; B. Capp, Cromwell's Navy. The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-1660 ( Oxford, 1992); D. Davies, Gentlemen and Tarpaulins: The Offi-cers and Men of the Restoration Navy

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Military Revolution Debate: Readings on the Military Transformation of Early Modern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 387

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.