The Military Revolution Debate: Readings on the Military Transformation of Early Modern Europe

By Clifford J. Rogers | Go to book overview

9
Strategy and Tactics in the Thirty Years'
War: The 'Military Revolution'

DAVID A. PARROTT

FOR TWENTY YEARS Professor Michael Roberts' work on the 'Military Revolution' of the period 1560-1660 enjoyed undisputed pre-eminence as the accepted interpretation of military developments in early modern Europe. 1 In 1976, an article by Geoffrey Parker made the first -- and to my knowledge, only -- general criticisms of Roberts'thesis that a series of tactical changes had a revolutionary impact upon European warfare. 2 Professor Parker expressed reasoned doubts about whether these changes could be described as revolutionary, since serious inconsistencies emerge in any attempt to assess their practical impact. Why, in 1634, did the tactically conservative Spanish army wipe out the 'new model' Swedish at Nördlingen? 3 Why were the developments in tactics and strategy unable to bring the European conflict to any decisive conclusion? Parker's suggestion is that Roberts greatly over-emphasized inflexibility and traditionalism in the 'conservative' armies, particularly the Spanish. He proposes that it is possible to trace a receptiveness to similar tactical developments back at least to the condottiere of the fifteenth century, and that a willingness to approach common military problems was not confined to the Dutch and the Swedes. In matters of developing firepower, the quality of cavalry, the deployment of small units and in effective training, the Spanish army was quite as progressive as its rivals. 4

Yet the effect of this is to confirm by implication the importance of the tactical changes commonly ascribed to the Nassau and to Gustavus Adolphus. The value and relevance of these developments in explaining military success in the first half of the seventeenth century are not questioned; neither is the assumption of the importance of tactical change explored in any general way. Some further re-evaluation of the way in which battles were won and lost during the period may therefore be possible and valuable even though, in the absence of entirely accurate accounts of the conduct of specific engagements, some of the proposals must remain conjectural.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Military Revolution Debate: Readings on the Military Transformation of Early Modern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 387

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.