Pheromone Communication in Social Insects: Ants, Wasps, Bees, and Termites

By Robert K. Vander Meer; Michael D. Breed et al. | Go to book overview

studies have been supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Strategic and Operating Grants and Simon Fraser University.


References Cited

Barbier, J., and E. Lederer, 1960. Structure chimique de la substance royale de la reine d'abeille (Apis mellifica L.). Comptes Rendus des Seances de L'Academie de Science Paris, 251: 1131-35.

Blum, M. S., 1993. Honey Bee Pheromones. In The Hive and the Honey Bee, ( J. M. Graham , Ed.), Dadant and Sons, Hamilton, Illinois, pp. 376-378.

Breed, M. D., T. M. Stiller, M. Blum, and R. E. Page Jr., 1992. "Honeybee nestmate recognition: Effects of queen feces pheromones". J. Chem. Ecol. 18:1633-1640.

Callow, R. K., and N. C. Johnston, 1960. The chemical constitution and synthesis of queen substances of the honeybees (Apis mellifera). Bee World, 41: 152-53.

Callow, R. K., J. R. Chapman, and P. N. Paton, 1964. "Pheromones of the honeybee: chemical studies of the mandibular gland secretion of the queen". J. Apic. Res. 3: 77-89.

Espelie, K. E., V. M. Butz, and A. Dietz, 1990. "Decyl decanoate: A major component of the tergite glands of honeybee queens, (Apis mellifera L.)". J. Apic. Res. 29: 15- 19.

Free, J. B., 1987. Pheromones of Social Bees. Cornell Univ. Press, Ithaca, NY.

Gehrke, C. W., and K. Leimer, 1971. "Trimethylsilylation of amino acids. Derivatization and chromatography". J. Chromatogr. 57: 219-238.

Higo, H. A. M.L. Winston, and K. N. Slessor, 1995. "Mechanisms by which honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) queen pheromone sprays enhance pollination". Ann. Entomol. Soc. Amer. 88: 366-373.

Jay, S. C., 1968. "Factors influencing ovary development of worker honeybees under natural conditions". Can. J. of Zoology, 46: 345-347.

Kaminski, L.-A., K. N. Slessor, M. L. Winston, N. W. Hay, and J. H. Borden, 1990. "Honey bee response to queen mandibular pheromone in laboratory bioassays". J. Chem. Ecol. 16: 841-850.

Loper, G. M., O. R. Taylor, Jr., M. L. Winston, L. J. Foster, and J. Kochansky, 1995. "Relative attractiveness of queen mandibular pheromone components to honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) drones". J. Apic. Res. in press.

Moritz, R. F.A., and R. M. Crewe, 1988. "Chemical signals of queens in kin recognition of honeybees", Apis mellifera L. J. Comp. Physiol. A. 164: 83-89.

Moritz, R. F.A., and R. M. Crewe 1991. The volatile emissions of honeybee queens (Apis mellifera L.). Apidologie 22: 205-212.

Naumann, K., M. L. Winston, K. N. Slessor, G. D. Prestwich, and F. X. Webster, 1991. "The production and transmission of honey bee queen (Apis mellifera L.) mandibular gland pheromone". Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology 29: 321- 332.

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Pheromone Communication in Social Insects: Ants, Wasps, Bees, and Termites
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Literature Cited viii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One Introduction: Sources and Secretions 1
  • 1: Pheromone Communication in Social Insects: Sources and Secretions 3
  • Introduction 3
  • Concluding Remarks 25
  • Acknowledgements 25
  • References 25
  • 2: The Cuticle and Cuticular Hydrocarbons of Insects: Structure, Function, and Biochemistry 34
  • 2: The Cuticle and Cuticular Hydrocarbons of Insects 34
  • Concluding Remarks 49
  • Concluding Remarks 49
  • Acknowledgments 49
  • Part Two Nestmate Recognition in Social Insects 55
  • 3: Chemical Cues in Kin Recognition: Criteria for Identification, Experimental Approaches, and the Honey Bee as an Example 57
  • Introduction 57
  • Literature Cited 71
  • 4: Nestmate Recognition in Ants 79
  • 5: Nest and Nestmate Discrimination in Independent-Founding Paper Wasps 104
  • 5: Nest and Nestmate Discrimination in Independent-Founding Paper Wasps 104
  • Conclusions 119
  • References Cited 121
  • 6: Nestmate Recognition in Termites 126
  • Conclusion 145
  • References 145
  • Part Three Social Insect Releaser Pheromones 157
  • 7: Pheromone Directed Behavior in Ants 159
  • Introduction 159
  • Conclusion 182
  • References Cited 182
  • 8: Releaser Pheromones in Termites 193
  • Conclusion 208
  • Acknowledgments 208
  • References Cited 209
  • 9: Chemical Communication in Social Wasps 216
  • References Cited 230
  • 10: Exocrine Glands and Their Products in Non-Apis Bees: Chemical, Functional and Evolutionary Perspectives 236
  • 10: Exocrine Glands and Their Products in Non-Apis Bees 236
  • Conclusions 251
  • References 252
  • 11: Mass Action in Honey Bees 257
  • References Cited 285
  • Part Four Social Insect Primer Pheromones 291
  • 12: Primer Pheromones in Ants 293
  • Introduction 293
  • Concluding Remarks 308
  • Acknowledgements 309
  • Literature Cited 310
  • 13: Primer Pheromones and Possible Soldier Caste Influence on the Evolution of Sociality in Lower Termites 314
  • Acknowledgment 326
  • References Cited 326
  • 14: Royal Flavors 331
  • Conclusions 340
  • Acknowledgments 340
  • References Cited 341
  • Contributors 345
  • Author Index 347
  • Taxonomic Index 353
  • Subject Index 358
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