Seeking Common Ground: Canada-U.S. Trade Dispute Settlement Policies in the Nineties

By Andrew D. M. Anderson | Go to book overview

1504) which will report back to the Commission at the end of five years from the start of NAFTA on the relationship between competition laws and policies and trade in the free trade area. See Canada (1988f). By not developing a North American Subsidies Code to replace the Canada-U.S. Subsidies Code that was required to be negotiated in the Canada-U.S. FTA, the Parties under NAFTA are relying entirely on the proposed Subsidies Code in the recently completed GATT, Uruguay Round despite weaknesses in that proposed Code (which is argued in Chapter 7). There is even the possibility that the texts of the GATT Uruguay Round may never be successfully implemented as they were originally written. 17


Appendix 6.1: An Overview of NAFTA

"Trilateral" Dispute Settlement Arrangements

On December 17, 1992, the leaders of Canada, the United States and Mexico signed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (Canada 1992b and 1993c). While the purpose of this book is not to critique NAFTA, it is necessary, however, to understand how any institutional arrangements in that Agreement will affect the previous arrangements for trade and other dispute resolution found in the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). To a large extent, it could be argued that NAFTA was predominantly an effort at negotiation between the United States and Mexico. Canada asked to formally participate in the negotiations on September 24, 1990, more than three months after Mexican President Salinas de Gortari and U.S. President Bush indicated their desire to pursue a comprehensive free trade agreement. In fact, the trade negotiations between Mexico and the United States would in all likelihood have gone ahead regardless of whether Canada had wanted to participate in those negotiations. This is an extremely important point because it underscores the relatively little power that Canada had in the trade talks as well as its actual ability to have influenced any outcomes that the United States and Mexico could have reached quite independently of Canada in another set of negotiations. 18

It has been argued that if Canada had failed to participate in the Agreement, the United States would simply have continued to negotiate a bilateral trade agreement with Mexico anyway. The result would have been a hub-and-spoke model as outlined by Wonnacott ( 1990), with the spokes of the wheel being Canada and Mexico. If the hub-and-spokes approach had occurred, the United States may have been able to also pull in other Latin American countries to an expanded Mexican-U.S. FTA or to have negotiated more spokes with each of those countries in turn ( Wonnacott 1993). In either case, Canada would have been shut out of the negotiating process in those trade treaties which would have effectively reduced its influence over their

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Seeking Common Ground: Canada-U.S. Trade Dispute Settlement Policies in the Nineties
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.