Ecological Interactions and Biological Control

By David A. Andow; David W. Ragsdale et al. | Go to book overview

3
Ecological Approaches for
Biological Control of the
Aquatic Weed Eurasian Watermilfoil:
Resource and Interference
Competition, Exotic and
Endemic Herbivores and Pathogens

Sallie P. Sheldon


Scope of the Eurasian Watermilfoil Problem

The accidental or intentional introduction of exotic plants into aquatic systems, as into terrestrial systems, has resulted in the rapid expansion of populations of exotic species and a reduction in abundance and species richness of native aquatic macrophytes (e.g., Aiken et al. 1979; Carpenter 1980; Arlington and Mitchell 1986; Room 1990). Such changes in the aquatic macrophyte community affect both littoral communities and human uses of the waters. Communities of native aquatic macrophytes significantly influence lakewide processes such as rates of sedimentation and succession, thermal structure, and dissolved oxygen concentration ( Carpenter and Lodge 1986). Mixed native macrophyte beds support a diverse community of invertebrates ( Campbell and Clark 1983; Cyr and Downing 1988; Miller et al. 1992; Morrow et al. 1992). Invertebrates use aquatic macrophytes as structure: some eat the epiphytes that grow on leaf surfaces ( Bronmark 1989), and some feed on the plants directly ( Lodge and Lorman 1987; Lodge 1991; Newman 1991). Finally, aquatic macrophyte communities are important to fish both for supporting invertebrate prey and for refuge ( Crowder and Cooper 1982; Stein and Savino 1982; Nichols and Shaw 1986).

In contrast, the extensive, nearly monospecific stands of introduced macrophyres often support a low diversity of aquatic plants (e.g., Nichols and Shaw 1986; Madsen et al. 1991) and fewer macroinvertebrates ( Keast 1984). From an

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ecological Interactions and Biological Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.