Ecological Interactions and Biological Control

By David A. Andow; David W. Ragsdale et al. | Go to book overview

10
Deleterious Rhizobacteria
and Weed Biocontrol

Ann C. Kennedy

Public concern over surface water, groundwater, and food contamination has resulted in stricter pesticide regulations, fewer approved pesticides reaching the market, and the withdrawal of previously registered pesticides. As a result, growers are being forced to reduce the use of synthetic chemical pesticides and to rely on cultural and biological methods to control pests. Biological control of weeds is based on the premise that biotic factors have a significant influence on the competitive abilities of plant species. Phytotoxic effects of microorganisms are often plant species and cultivar specific. Microorganisms that selectively suppress weed species may alter competition among plants. These plant pathogens potentially may be used to regulate the growth of unwanted plant species growing simultaneously with more desirable plants ( Templeton 1982). This would be true especially if competitive weed growth coincided with environmental factors conducive to microbial growth and weed-suppressive activity. Biological control offers alternative means of suppressing weed growth and establishment in agricultural and range systems. Before biological control methods can be fully integrated into weed management systems, however, we need a greater understanding of the processes of host recognition, specificity, and colonization. Awareness of the ecological constraints of the pathogen and the weed is critical to successful biological weed control.

Most of the research on microbial control of weeds has concentrated on fungal plant pathogens for broadleaf weed control. Most notable is the use of rusts (Puccinia jaceae Otth.) for the control of diffuse knapweed (Centuria diffusa Lam.) ( Mortensen 1986; Watson and Clement 1986), and skeleton weed (Chondrilla juncea) control with the use of Puccinia chondrillina ( Cullen et al. 1973). Mycoherbicides, such as the fungal pathogens of weeds sold under the trade names of DeVine and Collego, are commercially available. DeVine is being used to control stranglervine (Morrenia odorata) in citrus ( Ridings 1986), and Collego (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschvnomene) ( Daniel et al. 1973) is used for the

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ecological Interactions and Biological Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.