Understanding Human Behavior for Effective Police Work

By Harold E. Russell; Allan Beigel | Go to book overview

was first noticed in professionals whose jobs required them to deal constantly with people in crisis.

We shall devote more discussion to this stress and other stressors in later chapters.


Summary

In this last chapter in the section on crisis situations, we have focused on one of the central figures in any crisis -- the victim. As a result of a crime, accident, medical emergency, or other crisis, any citizen can have an emotional response that must be handled by officers. The generic ABC model gives officers a structured approach to crisis intervention in a variety of situations. The skill officers show will reduce emotional trauma to the victim, enhance his or her cooperation with police, and lessen the severity of the crisis. Effective crisis intervention by police officers can "make the difference between averting a serious psychological disorder or experiencing one which may be so disabling that it can undermine the individual's effectiveness and happiness for years. At worst, it can lead to overt acts of suicide. Thus, psychological first aid provided by sensitive agents can be truly life saving" ( C. J. Frederick 1986, p. 346). Learning the necessary skills requires an understanding of the psychology of the victim and the adoption of approaches and techniques described in this chapter.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

BARD, M. 14 September 1982. Testimony presented at a public hearing of the President's Task Force on Victims of Crime, Washington, D.C.

BAND, M., and ELLISON, K. May 1974. "Crisis Intervention and Investigation of Forcible Rape." Police Chief 41( 5): 68-74.

BRAMMER, L. M. 1973. The Helping Relationship: Process and Skills. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.

CHELIMSKY, E. 1981. "Serving Victims: Agency Incentives and Individuals' Needs." In Evaluating Victim Services, ed. S. E. Salasin. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage.

DUNCAN, T. S. 1985. Domestic Crisis Intervention for Law Enforcement Officers. Lawrenceville, Va.: Brunswick Publications.

EHLY, S. 1986. Crisis Intervention Handbook. Washington, D.C.: National Association of Psychologists.

FIELDS, R. 1981. "Research on Victims." In Evaluating Victim Services, ed. S. E. Salasin. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage.

FLINT, R. T. 1975. The Psychology of Victims. Schiller Park, Ill.: Motorola Teleprograms.

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Understanding Human Behavior for Effective Police Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 the Changing Role of the Police Officer 3
  • Summary 11
  • Chapter 2 Foundations of a Professional Attitude Toward Human Behavior 13
  • Summary 17
  • Bibliography 17
  • Part II the Origins and Complexities of Human Behavior 19
  • Chapter 3 Normal Personality Development 21
  • Summary 28
  • Bibliography 29
  • Chapter 4 the Normal Personality in Operation: Conflicts and the Mechanisms of Defense 30
  • Summary 41
  • Bibliography 42
  • Chapter 5 Abnormal Behavior: What It is and What to Do 43
  • Summary 56
  • Bibliography 56
  • Part III Understanding Mental Illness 59
  • Chapter 6 Personality Disorders 61
  • Summary 68
  • Bibliography 68
  • Chapter 7 Neurotic Disorders 70
  • Summary 91
  • Bibliography 91
  • Chapter 8 Psychotic Disorders 93
  • Summary 107
  • Bibliography 108
  • Part IV Assessing and Managing Abnormal Behavior in the Field 111
  • Chapter 9 Psychopathic Behavior 113
  • Summary 129
  • Bibliography 130
  • Chapter 10 Aberrant Sexual Behavior 153
  • Bibliography 154
  • Chapter 11 Delinquent Behavior 157
  • Summary 164
  • Bibliography 164
  • Chapter 12 Drug-Dependent Behavior 165
  • Summary 181
  • Bibliography 181
  • Chapter 13 Paranoid Behavior 184
  • Summary 191
  • Bibliography 191
  • Chapter 14 Violent Behavior 193
  • Summary 220
  • Bibliography 221
  • Chapter 15 Suicidal Behavior 225
  • Summary 250
  • Bibliography 250
  • Part V Behavioral Aspects of Crisis Situations 253
  • Chapter 16 Behavioral Aspects of Disasters 255
  • Summary 267
  • Bibliography 268
  • Chapter 17 Behavioral Aspects of Crowd and Riot Control 288
  • Bibliography 289
  • Chapter 18 Behavioral Aspects of Hostage Situations 290
  • Summary 317
  • Bibliography 318
  • Chapter 19 Behavioral Aspects of Conflict Situations 319
  • Summary 326
  • Bibliography 326
  • Chapter 20 Behavioral Aspects of Crisis Intervention with Victims 327
  • Summary 339
  • Bibliography 339
  • Part VI the Stresses of Police Work 341
  • Chapter 21 Job-Related Stress 343
  • Summary 363
  • Bibliography 364
  • Chapter 22 Special Stress Situations 366
  • Summary 393
  • Bibliography 394
  • Chapter 23 the Brotherhood of Biochemistry: Its Implications for a Police Career 416
  • Part VII Conclusion 417
  • Chapter 24 the Role of the Mental Health Professional in Police Work 419
  • Summary 434
  • Bibliography 436
  • Index 437
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