other musicians was to serve him well in later years.

Alexander Koussevitzky had married another musician — Anne Barabeitchik, a pianist. Exactly how many children she bore her husband is not clear, although Serge Koussevitzky has implied that the family was large. A daughter, Anna, was ten years older than Serge. There were at least two other sons: Nicholas, later a piano-dealer in St. Petersburg, where he died in 1941, and Adolf, who attained a moderate reputation as musician, teacher, and conductor in Moscow before his death in 1939. *

The exact date of the birth of Serge Alexandrovitch is variously set down in reference-books and articles. For the most part the discrepancies are due to either misprints or confusion between the old and new styles of the Russian calendar. The date July 26, 1874, is given by the Riemann Russian Musical Dictionary, in this case the most reliable of the reference-books because it was published in 1904, before Koussevitzky's second marriage, which radically changed his life. This is the date now generally accepted, even by Koussevitzky himself.

Serge Alexandrovitch was only three years old when his mother died. He grew up in a home where the parental discipline was severe. It was necessarily strict in the matter of religious practices, for Alexander Koussevitzky insisted upon his children's rigid observance of the elaborate, taxing ritual of Orthodox Judaism. This demanded regular, frequent, and what must have been for young Serge wearisome attendance at religious services. In later life and in

____________________
*
Adolf was the father of Fabien Sevitzky, now conductor of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.
The date June 26, 1874, given in Lourié's official biography is probably a misprint.

-3-

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Koussevitzky
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Koussevitzky *
  • Table of Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Chapter I- Youth- Fact and Fancy 1
  • Chapter II- Moscow 8
  • Chapter III- Marriage 18
  • Chapter IV- Berlin 29
  • Chapter V- Moscow-Petersburg Shuttle 45
  • Chapter VI- They Shall Have Music 56
  • Chapter VII- Volga Boatmen 73
  • Chapter VIII- War and Revolution 87
  • Chapter IX- Paris 105
  • Chapter X- The Boston Symphony Orchestra 128
  • Chapter XI- Grand Seigneur in the Hub of the Universe 151
  • Chapter XII- Early American Years 174
  • Chapter XIII- Gradus AD Parnassum 195
  • Chapter XIV- Anniversary Season and Beyond 216
  • Chapter XV- Feuds and Frictions 236
  • Chapter XVI- Artist''s Life 253
  • Chapter XVII- Tanglewood 274
  • Chapter XVIII- The Changing Scene 296
  • Chapter XIX- Unionism Comes to Stay 308
  • Chapter XX- These Later Years 324
  • Chapter XXI- A Critical Summing Up 337
  • Acknowledgments 353
  • Notes 355
  • Appendix A 363
  • Appendix B 370
  • Appendix C 376
  • Appendix D 378
  • Index 383
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