The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837

By James Roger Sharp | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII

Pennsylvania and New York

1

AT THE TIME of the Panic, the Middle Atlantic and New England states of the Northeast had the most sophisticated and diversified economies in the country.!This highly commercialized area also had the highest proportion of urbanized population. In 1840 about 18 or 19 per cent of the northeasterners were city dwellers, as compared with the Southeast, which ranked second, where 8 per cent were city dwellers.1

New York and Pennsylvania deserve special attention. They were the most important states in the section, with Philadelphia and New York City serving as the financial and commercial capitals of the nation. Furthermore, these two states, along with Virginia, had provided the key support for the Jeffersonian coalition as well as for the development of the Jacksonian alliance. New York and, to a lesser degree, Pennsylvania have been treated in great detail by historians, and indeed the complexity and intricacy of their economic and political institutions deserve thorough and careful analysis. For the purpose of this work, however, a summary treatment is given here to place the two states in proper perspective with the other states of the northeastern section, as well as with the other states of the Union.


2

Pennsylvania had a unique position in the country throughout the war that raged between the Jacksonians and the banks, primarily because Philadelphia, as the home of the Second Bank of the United

____________________
1
North, Economic Growth, 258.

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Graphs and Maps xiv
  • Song from a Jackson Barbecue September 25, 1839 *
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - The Democratic Party and the Politics of Agrarianism 3
  • Chapter II - Banking Before the Panic 25
  • The West 51
  • Chapter III - Mississippi 55
  • Chapter IV - Mississippi Constituencies 89
  • Chapter V - The Southwest 110
  • Chapter VI - Ohio 123
  • Chapter VII - Ohio Constituencies 160
  • Chapter VIII - The Northwest 190
  • The East 211
  • Chapter IX - Virginia 215
  • Chapter X - Virginia Constituencies 247
  • Chapter XI - The Southeast 274
  • Chapter XII - Pennsylvania and New York 285
  • Chapter XIII - The Northeast 306
  • Conclusion 321
  • Appendices 331
  • Notes to Tables 342
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.