The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837

By James Roger Sharp | Go to book overview

TABLE III (Continued)
Per Cent Tax Per Average
of Votes Capita Slave- Rank
Virginia Cast for Demo- Paid in Eco- holding in
Constituency Democratic cratic 1840 (in nomic in Slave-
1836-184417 Nominees18 Rank dollars)19 Rank 184020 holding
Nansemond 36.57 94 0.434 49 0.723 56
Norfolk, City of 36.40 95 0.958 102 0.514 46
Princess Anne 35.37 96 0.494 59 0.735 57
Very Strong Whig
Greenbrier 34.90 97 0.492 58 0.162 27
Hardy 32.63 98 0.443 52 0.174 28
Kanawha 30.17 99 0.321 26 0.233 32
Augusta 28.83 100 0.508 60 0.267 35
Ohio 28.47 101 0.368 36 0.016 5
Accomack 24.83 102 0.355 34 0.371 42
Richmond, City of 24.50 103 3.962 11 0.594 50
Loudoun 22.80 104 0.660 79 0.348 40
Westmoreland 21.93 105 0.427 48 0.811 65
York 34 20.00 106 0.380 37 0.810 64
Charles City 18.50 107 0.627 73.5 1.039 77
James City 35 16.70 108 0.811 96 1.063 79
Northampton 13.80 109 0.625 72 0.884 69
Warwick 13.50 110 0.785 95 1.330 94

NOTES TO TABLES
1
The use of statistical techniques has allowed me, I hope, to be clearer, more logical, and persuasive in presenting my argument about the nature of political support in Mississippi, Ohio, and Virginia. However, it should be made clear that any attempt to "quantify" a historical problem raises a number of difficulties. By using rank-difference correlations to indicate the closeness of the association between wealth and politics or slaveholding and politics, I do not wish to imply that I believe that the economic factor is the sole motivating force in shaping political response. Indeed, I have used the correlations and political and economic rankings only as the underlying foundation for my analysis and hopefully have enriched the discussion by an impressionistic consideration of factors that do not lend themselves to quantification, such as geographic, social, and ethnocultural characteristics.

In one way the use of statistical data makes answers neater and more precise, but it also suggests many questions. For example, I have used counties (and, in

-342-

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The Jacksonians Versus the Banks: Politics in the States after the Panic of 1837
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Graphs and Maps xiv
  • Song from a Jackson Barbecue September 25, 1839 *
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - The Democratic Party and the Politics of Agrarianism 3
  • Chapter II - Banking Before the Panic 25
  • The West 51
  • Chapter III - Mississippi 55
  • Chapter IV - Mississippi Constituencies 89
  • Chapter V - The Southwest 110
  • Chapter VI - Ohio 123
  • Chapter VII - Ohio Constituencies 160
  • Chapter VIII - The Northwest 190
  • The East 211
  • Chapter IX - Virginia 215
  • Chapter X - Virginia Constituencies 247
  • Chapter XI - The Southeast 274
  • Chapter XII - Pennsylvania and New York 285
  • Chapter XIII - The Northeast 306
  • Conclusion 321
  • Appendices 331
  • Notes to Tables 342
  • Bibliography 351
  • Index 379
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