The Cornerstone

By Zoé Oldenbourg; Edward Hyams | Go to book overview

The rector was a good deal put out when he learned that the prisoner he had treated so harshly was a man of distinction and good family and, moreover, more unlucky than guilty; but he did not reverse his decision.

"The fact that he is rich in the world's goods does not entitle him to more consideration than a poor man," he said. "Since his case is sub judice, let him remain in his cell and eat the bread of penitence."

So Haguenier was sent back to his cell; but this did not arouse in him as much bitterness as he expected. His three weeks spent in prayer, while he had thought himself sunk in distraction and despair, had nevertheless brought him appeasement. He realized that his prayer, bitter though it tasted, had become for him a nourishment as real as bread and that it had entered into him without his perceiving it. He maintained his prayer in his cell, still standing with his hands grasping the bar of the window; it gave him strength and his spirit became firm and his mind no longer wandered. But he was aware of a great change in himself and a detachment from everything which was happening to him. He no longer even felt remorse for his sin. It was such a small matter in comparison with the suffering it had caused; his sin was like a wisp of straw which, catching fire by accident, burns down the house. His own house had been burned down, his father, and his own life. Now let God help him.


THE SEVENTH TRIAL or MARIE CROWNED

ON THE fifth Sunday in Lent Haguenier, having returned from mass, was waiting for Aielot; he was hoping that Jacques of Pouilli would come too: for Jacques, at least, never reproached him and prevented his wife from speaking too much. The door opened and the warder showed in a woman smaller than Aielot, wrapped in a large, green mantle, her head covered with a veil.

-413-

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The Cornerstone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part One 1
  • Farewell 3
  • A Bitter Love 7
  • Haguenier: I. First Encounter 14
  • The Feast of Wolves 19
  • Auberi 24
  • The Lady of Beauty 28
  • Haguenier: Ii. a Father and a Brother 32
  • Eglantine 38
  • Ernaut, or the Heavy Heart 43
  • Noble Youths and Maidens 48
  • The Bitter Cup 50
  • Arabesque 56
  • The Arrows of the Sun 62
  • Haguenier: Iii. First Rift 63
  • Devil in the Heart 71
  • The Body's Darkness 76
  • The Songbird 83
  • The Festival 92
  • Misunderstood 96
  • Pity 99
  • Haguenier's Marriage 103
  • Departure 107
  • A Lady's Game 109
  • Part Two 117
  • Misfortunes of War 119
  • The Burning Roads 126
  • Fear 140
  • Mélusine 144
  • Crow's Field 151
  • Reflections Upon the End of the World 158
  • The Heart of Diamond 162
  • Part Three 173
  • Bitter Blood 175
  • Crusade 179
  • Haguenier: Iv. the Widening Rift 182
  • Songs and Reveries 185
  • Obstacles 189
  • The Inheritance 195
  • Marie: Portraits 200
  • Ferret Heart 204
  • Haguenier: First Trial. the Oath 209
  • The Broken Body 213
  • Joceran Again 220
  • Haguenier: the Second Trial. A Taste of Paradise 224
  • The Black Mere 226
  • Haguenier: the Third Trial. Harshness 229
  • The World Turned Upside Down 234
  • Haguenier: the Fourth Trial. the Cup Withdrawn 236
  • Family Troubles 245
  • Haguenier: the Fifth Trial. Sacrifice 247
  • Nightmare 252
  • Herbert 258
  • Malediction 260
  • Haguenier: the Sixth Trial. Life Parts Lovers 271
  • The Fairies 281
  • The Storm 288
  • The Wolf 294
  • The Other Stricken Bird 300
  • Part Four 307
  • Marseilles 309
  • The Promised Land 335
  • A Masterless House 362
  • Herbert's Wife 369
  • The Bad Steward 373
  • The Stricken Man 378
  • Death Unwelcomed 391
  • Still Life 400
  • Pity 407
  • The Seventh Trial or Marie Crowned 413
  • Part Five 425
  • The End of Auberi's Service 427
  • Jerusalem 434
  • Brother Ernaut 445
  • The Last Pilgrimage 462
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