Contesting Politics: Women in Ireland, North and South

By Yvonne Galligan; Eilís Ward et al. | Go to book overview

still intact, the women senators in particular sought to check the regression in the status of women in the new state.

In particular, women with a history of involvement in public life that predated the solidifying of the great cleavage of Irish political life were more free to criticise the shape the new state was taking. By contrast, women who were drawn into the Dáil because of their familial relationships with dead nationalist leaders remained bound by nationalist politics. Within this overarching frame, equality issues were rendered unimportant. The process of state building and the consolidating of power by the two parties, former civil war opponents, eclipsed other dimensions of politics.


NOTES
1
The Blueshirts were a militaristic, anti-IRA movement of the 1930s that was associated with the Cumann na nGaedhael (later Fine Gael) Party and inspired also by Fascist ideology.

REFERENCES

Adams Michael, Censorship: The Irish Experience, Dublin: Sceptre Books, 1968.

Carlson Julia, ' Banned in Ireland': Censorship and the Irish Writer, London: Routledge, 1990.

Clancy Mary, ' ". . . it was our joy to keep the flag flying": A Study of the Women's Suffrage Campaign in County Galway', UCG Women's Studies Centre Review, 3, 1995, pp. 91-104.

Clear Caitríona Nuns in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, Gill and Dublin: Macmillan, 1987.

Conlon Lil, Cumann na mBan and the Women of Ireland, 1913-25, Kilkenny: Kilkenny People, 1969.

Donnolly Paula McArdle ' The Munster Women's Franchise League, 1910-1918', in Bernadette Whelan (ed.), Clio's Daughters: Essays on Irish Women's History 1845 to 1939, Limerick: University of Limerick Press, 1997.

Crossman Virginia, Local Government in Nineteenth Century Ireland, Belfast: Institute of Irish Studies, 1994.

Hearn Mona, Below Stairs: Domestic Service Remembered in Dublin and Beyond, 1880-1922, Dublin: Lilliput Press, 1993.

Hollis Patricia, Ladies Elect: Women in English Local Government, 1865-1914, Oxford: Clarendon, 1987.

Holmes Janice, and Diane Urquhart (eds.), Coming into the Light: The Work Politics and Religion of Women in Ulster, 1840-1940, Belfast: Institute of Irish Studies, 1994.

Jones Mary, These Obstreperous Lassies: A History of the IWWU, Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1988.

Litton Helen, and Kathleen Clarke, Revolutionary Women: Kathleen Clarke, 1878-1972. An Autobiography, Dublin: O'Brien, 1991.

-217-

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