Cytological Technique: The Principles Underlying Routine Methods

By John R. Baker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

CYTOLOGICAL technique is co-extensive with cytology, and the whole subject could not be covered even superficially in such a small book as this. I have confined myself to the techniques of making permanent preparations, especially sections, intended to show the structure of the cells of many-celled animals under the microscope. Wonderful advances are being made in various other branches of cytology. Perhaps the most striking is the actual isolation of mitochondria and other cell-constituents, a technique that we owe to the pioneer work of Bensley and Hoerr ( 1934). Old techniques introduced by Raspail in 1829 and Altmann in 1890 have been revived to give us micro-incineration and the freezing-drying method once more. Micro-manipulation enables us literally to probe the living cell. Histochemistry has made great advances: enzymes have actually been made to reveal their presence by their action in sections, and ultra-violet spectrophotometry has taught us much about the distribution of nucleoproteins in cells. The electron microscope makes us hope for still minuter knowledge of cellular structure, while X-rays are revealing details of the structure of proteins far beyond anything that the ordinary microscope can detect. We may hope that other advances, as wonderful as these, may be made in the not-far-distant future. Amid all the excitement of recent cytological research, it may seem a little prosaic to hark back and look at ordinary stained sections. Nevertheless, cytology probably owes more to the staining of sections than to any other technique. Anyone who doubts this should ask himself how much we should know about chromosomes without the aid of this method. Whatever kind of cytology interests us

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cytological Technique: The Principles Underlying Routine Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to the Second Edition v
  • Preface vi
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - Introduction 1
  • Chapter III - Simple Fixatives 21
  • Chapter IV - Fixing Mixtures 42
  • Chapter V - Microtomy 104
  • Conclusion 171
  • Chapter VIII - Methods for Chromosomes, Mitochondria and the Golgi Element 172
  • List of References 198
  • Index 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.