Reconstruction in Mississippi

By James Wilford Garner | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE primary purpose of this work is to give a detailed study of reconstruction in Mississippi with reference to its political, military, economic, educational, and legal phases. A secondary purpose is to present a brief review of the Civil War so far as it affected directly the state of Mississippi or the people thereof, and, accordingly, special emphasis has been laid upon those results of the war that sustained more or less relation to the problems of reconstruction. Realizing the incompleteness of any history of reconstruction which concludes with the readmission of the state to the Union and the reëstablishment of civil government, the author has followed up the results of the congressional policy as they appeared in the period of "carpet bag" and negro domination, and has carried his narrative down to the final overthrow of the party that had been the especial beneficiaries of the congressional policy, -- an event locally known as the "revolution of 1875."

The author is disposed to believe that a thorough study of the actual working out of reconstruction in its different relations and activities in any one of the Southern States will be of some value to the general student of American history, for, after all, the process and results in one state were essentially the same in all. So far as he knows no attempt has yet been made in this direction, and in undertaking to write such a history of Mississippi he has been possessed of a good many misgivings. More than one person to whom he applied for advice ventured the opinion that the smoke of battle had not sufficiently cleared away and with it the passions and animosities of the war to make it possible for any American to discover and set forth the facts of reconstruction without bias or prejudice. Although fully sen

-vii-

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