New Public Administration

By H. George Frederickson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is an accumulation of ideas, thoughts, and opinions that have been greatly and positively influenced by my teachers, my colleagues, and my students. Certain of my teachers were especially influential: Stewart Grow, Jesse Reeder, and Robert Riggs of Brigham Young University; Vincent Ostrom of Indiana University; Winston Crouch and John Bollens of the University of California at Los Angeles; Peter Woll of Brandeis University; Frank Sherwood, Elmer K. Nelson, Bruce Storm, and the late John Pfiffner of the University of Southern California; Harry Reynolds of the University of Nebraska at Omaha; and Arvo Van Alstyne of the University of Utah.

Among my colleagues over the years who have been especially helpful, most particularly are Steven K. Bailey of Harvard University; Harlan Cleveland of the Aspen Institute; Dwight Waldo, Guthrie Birkhead, Jesse Burkhead, Seymour Sacks, Henry Lambright, and John C. Honey of the Maxwell School, Syracuse University; Douglas Rae of Yale University; Charles Wise, Charles Bonser, Louis C. Gawthrop, York Wilburn, John Ryan, Donald Klingner, and Eugene McGregor of Indiana University; George Nicholas and Leo Cram of the University of Missouri; Keith Quincy, Henry Kass, Robert Herold, Shane Mahoney, George Durrie, Lawrence Kiser, Neal Zimmerman, and Edward Connerly of Eastern Washington University; Alan K. Campbell and Gilda Jacobs of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management; Frank Marini of San Diego State University; Yong Hyo Cho of the University of Akron; Kenneth Howard of the State of Wisconsin; Michael Harmon, Stephen Chitwood, and David Porter of the George Washington University; Lee Fritschler, Robert Cleary, Howard McCurdy, and Dwight Ink of the American University; Orion White, Robert Deland, and Deil Wright of the University of North Carolina

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Public Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Foreword x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - New Public Administration in Context 13
  • 3 - Social Equity and Public Administration 31
  • 4 - Statics and Dynamics in Public Administration 48
  • 5 - The Geography of Public Administration 70
  • 6 - Education and Public Administration 93
  • 7 - Public Administration in the 1980s 112
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 130
  • Index 137
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 143

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.