New Public Administration

By H. George Frederickson | Go to book overview

2: New Public Administration in Context

The primary instrument of our success in this century has been neither our military prowess nor our wealth, but our most successful social invention: the modern organization. Americans have moved into this last quarter of the twentieth century with only the slightest awareness that the modern organization, with its accouterments of power and control, has become the dominant force in our lives, shaping and changing American values and the American people to suit its requirements. Modern organizations have influenced us so profoundly, but so quietly that we are scarcely aware that they are our major agencies for social control. We take them for granted in much the same way we accept television commercials, the "two minute warning," and Muzak. -- William G. Scott and David K. Hart, Organizational America


New public administration emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a response to several stimuli, most notably the war in Vietnam, continuing racial unrest, continuing dissatisfaction with the intellectual basis of public administration, and the general shifting going on in the social science disciplines. The three major collections of essays generally identified with new public administration ( Frank Marini Toward a New Public Administration, Dwight Waldo Public Administration in a Time of Turbulence, and George Frederickson's Neighborhood Control in the 1970s) serve to illustrate that there is not a new public administration or the new public administration.1 There is, rather, a rich variety of interpretations of what is going on in the social sciences and how that applies to public problems. There is a wide array of values associated with new public administration, and these values are not always consistent. Therefore, I strongly resist the notion that there must be a single, agreed-upon new public administration with an attendant model that is a

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Public Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Foreword x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - New Public Administration in Context 13
  • 3 - Social Equity and Public Administration 31
  • 4 - Statics and Dynamics in Public Administration 48
  • 5 - The Geography of Public Administration 70
  • 6 - Education and Public Administration 93
  • 7 - Public Administration in the 1980s 112
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 130
  • Index 137
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 143

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.