New Public Administration

By H. George Frederickson | Go to book overview

5: The Geography of Public Administration

(6:30 a.m. My wife, sleepily) "Hello? You want to speak to the Mayor? Well, it's awfully early in the ... All right, just a minute. (Poking me) Hey! Psst! It's for you, Highness." (Early morning bass) "This is the Mayor speaking."

"Mayor?"

"Yes. Who is this?"

"This is a taaaaaxpayer."

"What can I do for you?"

"Mayor. I seen that big pitchur in the paper last night about redoin' the whole East Side -- tearin' down all those tenements and puttin' up a new civic center. That your idea?"

(A little proudly) "Why, yes."

"Mayor."

"Yes."

"Why the hell don't you stop tryin' to build Radio City and come down here and collect my garbage. It stinks!" (Click!) -- Stephen K. Bailey, "A Structured Interaction Pattern for Harpsichord and Kazoo"


Orthodoxy

The earliest attempts to comprehend organizations in this century were structural. Max Weber designed a formal model based on a hierarchy of authority -- a hierarchy that was unidimensionally mapped (by others) on a piece of paper.1 Thus began the organization chart. In attempting either to describe how the organization works or to design the workings of an ideal organization, the classic organization scholars gave much of their attention to the boxes and to the solid and dotted lines of the organization chart. A distribution was made during this era between the functional or line hierarchy on the one hand and the auxiliary staff hierarchy on the other, as well as between the auxiliary staff

-70-

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New Public Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vi
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Foreword x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - New Public Administration in Context 13
  • 3 - Social Equity and Public Administration 31
  • 4 - Statics and Dynamics in Public Administration 48
  • 5 - The Geography of Public Administration 70
  • 6 - Education and Public Administration 93
  • 7 - Public Administration in the 1980s 112
  • Notes 122
  • Bibliography 130
  • Index 137
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