The Collapse of the Democratic Presidential Majority: Realignment, Dealignment, and Electoral Change from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton

By David G. Lawrence | Go to book overview

3
The Decline of New Deal Economic Cleavage: Social Class and Issue Salience

The two mini-realignments that transformed a solid Democratic presidential majority in the 1940s into a solid Republican presidential majority in the 1980s were very different in character. Investigation of the first of them is limited by the fact that the golden age of academic survey research begins only after the 1946-1950 period when change occurred. But it is nonetheless possible to use more fragmentary pre-1946 materials to establish the broad outlines of the early post-war era and to then chart the continuation of trends and their consequences into the 1950s and early 1960s.

Class and the economics of class had been the single greatest building blocks for Democratic dominance of presidential elections since the Depression. The Democrats profited from such concerns in two distinct ways: first, as the party believed best able to produce prosperity in general; second, as the defender of the particular economic interests of the disadvantaged majority. Increasing prosperity in the immediate post-war years clearly threatened both appeals: rising affluence and the simple passage of time since 1929-1932 diluted the relevance of Republican economic failure in the Hoover years at the same time as it reduced the ranks of those who constituted the Democratic blue-collar base. Increasing affluence combined with increasing distance to the Depression to gradually but inexorably deprive the Democrats of the social basis of the Roosevelt coalition.


SOCIAL CLASS AND THE BASIS
OF THE NEW DEAL COALITION

The realignment of 1896 is usually seen as introducing an era in which Democratic and Republican voters were little differentiated by social class. The Depression of 1893 occurred under a Democratic president: the result was catastrophic for the Democrats in general and for the conservative, eastern, hard-money faction of the party which Cleveland represented in particular. The nomination in 1896 of William Jennings Bryan, prairie radical and advocate of free silver, and the

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Collapse of the Democratic Presidential Majority: Realignment, Dealignment, and Electoral Change from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.