A Dictionary of American Proverbs

By Wolfgang Mieder; Stewart A. Kingsbury et al. | Go to book overview

D

dab Raw dabs make fat lads. Rec. dist.: Ill.1st cit.: 1678 Ray, Proverbs (Scottish). 20c. coll.: Stevenson 769: 16.

dainties Who dainties love, shall beggars prove. Rec. dist.: Calif.1st cit.: 1573 Tusser, Hundreth Good Pointes of Husbandrie; US 1749 Franklin, PRAlmanac. 20c. coll.: ODEP165, Whiting92, Stevenson 479: 10.

daintySEE Too much PLENTY makes mouths dainty.

dairy You don't have to buy a dairy just because you want a glass of milk. Var.: You don't have to buy a cow just because you want a glass of milk. Rec. dist.: Wash.

daisy Daisies won't tell. Rec. dist.: Calif., Ill., Ind., Kans.

dam Where the dam is lowest the water first flows over. Rec. dist.: Ill.

damnedSEE LIFE is just one damned thing after another.

dance (n.) What you lose in the dance, you make up in the turn about. Rec. dist.: Vt.

SEE also The PARROT has fine feathers, but he doesn't go to the dance. / A morning's RAIN is like an old woman's dance: it doesn't last long.

dance (v.) 1. He dances well to whom fortune pipes. Rec. dist.: Can.1st cit.:ca 1390 Chaucer, Prologue to Reeve's Tale. 20c. coll.: ODEP166, Stevenson 483:9.

2. If you don't know how to dance, you say that the drum is bad. Rec. dist.: N.Y.

3. If you want to dance, you must pay the fiddler. Vars.: (a) He who dances must pay the fiddler. (b) He who dances pays the fiddler. (c) He who dances shall pay the fiddler. (d) If you dance, you must pay the piper. (e) If you're going to dance, you must pay the fiddler. (t) The dancer must pay the fiddler. (g) The dancer must pay the piper. (h) The ones that dance have to pay the fiddler. (i) They who dance must pay the fiddler. (j) Those who dance must pay the fiddler. (k) You may dance, but, remember, the fiddler is always to pay. Rec. dist.: U.S., Can.1st cit.: 1638 Taylor, Taylor's Feast; US 1740 Jonathan Belcher Papers, Mass.Hist.Soc. Collections ( 1893-94). 20c. coll.: ODEP615, Whiting149, CODP48, Stevenson 1798:9, T&W131, Whiting( MP) 495.

4. When you go to dance, take heed whom you take by the hand. Rec. dist.: Okla.1st cit.: 1621 Robinson, Adagia in Latin and English. 20c. coll.: ODEP166, Stevenson 481:1.

5. You can't dance at two weddings with one pair of feet. Rec. dist.: Calif. dancing You need more than dancing shoes to be a dancer. Rec. dist.: Ill.

danger1. A common danger causes common action. Rec. dist.: Ill.

2. A danger foreseen is half avoided. Rec. dist.: Calif., Ill., Ind.1st cit.: 1611 Cotgrave, Dictionary of French and English Tongues; US 1754 Diary of Ebenezer Parkman, ed. Wallett , Am.Antiq.Soc. Proceedings ( 1961-66). 20c. coll.: Stevenson 483:15, Whiting93, Whiting ( MP) 149.

3. After the danger everyone is wise. Rec. dist.: Calif.1st cit.: 1523 Erasmus, Adagia, tr. Taverner. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 2540:3.

4. Better face danger than be always in fear. Rec. dist.: Ill., Mich.1st cit.: 1542 Erasmus, Apophthegms, tr. Udall. 20c. coll.: ODEP167, Stevenson 485:7.

5. Danger begets caution. Rec. dist.: Ind.

6. Danger is next neighbor to security. Rec. dist.: Ill.1st cit.: 1607 Dobson's Dry Bobs; US 1875 Scarborough, Chinese Proverbs. 20c. coll.: ODEP167, Stevenson 484:4.

7. Danger past, God is forgotten. Rec. dist.: Okla., Tex., Vt.1st cit.: 1571 Read, Lord Burghley and Queen Elizabeth. 20c. coll.: ODEP 167, Stevenson 485:6.

8. Dangers are conquered by dangers. Rec. dist.: Ill.1st cit.: 1539 Publilius Syrus, Sententiae

-133-

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A Dictionary of American Proverbs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • A 3
  • B 33
  • C 79
  • D 133
  • E 173
  • F 193
  • G 245
  • I 323
  • J 337
  • K 345
  • L 357
  • M 395
  • N 423
  • O 435
  • P 447
  • Q 493
  • R 497
  • S 521
  • T 579
  • U 623
  • V 629
  • W 637
  • Y 685
  • Z 689
  • Bibliography 691
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