A Dictionary of American Proverbs

By Wolfgang Mieder; Stewart A. Kingsbury et al. | Go to book overview

P

pace 'Tis the pace that kills. Rec. dist.: Okla., Tex.1st cit.: 1850 Thackeray, Pendennis; US 1855 Hammett, Wonderful Adventures of Captain Priest. 20c. coll.: ODEP606, T&W 274, CODP174, Stevenson 1736:9, Whiting ( MP) 479.

See ALSO An early START and a steady pace make the slowest win the race.

pack(it.)See To carry CARE into your bed is to sleep with a pack on your back. / Every HORSE thinks his pack heaviest. / Let every PEDDLER carry his own pack. / Throw a STONE in a pack of dogs, and the one that's hit will holler.

pack(v.)See Many can pack CARDS that cannot play.

package You can't tell what's in a package by the cover. Vars.:(a) You can never tell a package by its wrapper. (b) You can never tell what's in a package by its cover. (c) You can't tell what's in a package by its wrapper. Rec. dist.: Ill.

See ALSO DIAMONDS come in small packages. / DYNAMITE comes in small packages.

packsaddleSee All ASS covered with gold is more respected than a horse with a packsaddle.

packthreadSee A mad BULL is not to be tied up with a packthread.

paddleSee Paddle your own CANOE.

padlock A bad padlock invites a picklock. Var.: A weak padlock invites a picklock. Rec. dist.: Ark., N.J., Ont.1st cit.: 1732 Fuller, Gnomologia. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1725:4.

See ALSO WEDLOCK is a padlock.

pail The empty pail makes the most noise. Rec. dist.: Ont.Infm.: Cf. barrel, cask. 1st cit.: ca 1430 Lydgate, Pilgrimage of Man, E. E. T. S. ( 1891); US 1676 Complete Writings of Roqer Williams ( 1963). 20c. coll.: CODP64, Whiting 59, ODEP220, Stevenson 676:17, T&W391.

pain(n.)1. An hour of pain is as long as a day of pleasure. Rec. dist.: Ill. 1st cit.: 1732 Fuller, Gnomologia. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1738:12.

2. Even pain is not painful. Rec. dist.: Ont.

3. Great pain and a little gain make a man soon weary. Rec. dist.: Mich.1st cit.:ca 1500 Early English Carols, ed. GreeneUS 1851 Melville, Moby Dick in Works ( 1922). 20c. coll.: ODEP334, T&W274, Stevenson 924:6.

4. Great pains cause us to forget the small ones. Rec. dist.: Ill.

5. Is there anything men take more pains about than to make themselves unhappy? Rec. dist.: N.Y., S.C.

6. Long pains are light ones; cruel ones are brief. Var.: Great pains shortly spread their force, and long-continued pains are not severe. Rec. dist.: N.Y., S.C.

7. No pains, no gains; no sweat, no sweet. Rec. dist.: U.S., Can. 1st cit.: 1577 Grange, Golden Aphroditis; US 1745 Franklin, PRALmanac. 20c. coll.: ODEP572, Whiting171, Stevenson 1739:10, T&W149, Whiting ( MP) 247.

8. Nothing brings more pain than too much pleasure. Rec. dist.: N.Y., S. C. 1st cit.:US 1738 Franklin, PRAlmanac. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1739:4.

9. Nothing conics without pain except dirt and long nails. Rec. dist.: Miss.1st cit.: 1561 Becon, Sick Man's Salve. 20c. coll.: ODEP581.

10. One pain kills another. Rec. dist.: Ont.

11. One's pain is lessened by another's anguish. Rec. dist.: Miss.1st cit.: 1594 Shakespeare , Romeo and Juliet. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1042:8.

12. Pain is no evil unless it conquers us. Rec. dist.: U.S.1st cit.:ca 1860 Kingsley, St. Maura. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1738:1.

13. Pain past is pleasure. Rec. dist.: N.C., Ont.1st cit.: 1732 Fuller, Gnomoloqia. 20c. coll.: Stevenson 1738:9.

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A Dictionary of American Proverbs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • A 3
  • B 33
  • C 79
  • D 133
  • E 173
  • F 193
  • G 245
  • I 323
  • J 337
  • K 345
  • L 357
  • M 395
  • N 423
  • O 435
  • P 447
  • Q 493
  • R 497
  • S 521
  • T 579
  • U 623
  • V 629
  • W 637
  • Y 685
  • Z 689
  • Bibliography 691
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