A Dictionary of American Proverbs

By Wolfgang Mieder; Stewart A. Kingsbury et al. | Go to book overview

U

ugliness Ugliness is the guardian of women. Rec. dist.: Ill.

SEE ALSO BEAUTY is loved without knowing anything, ugliness hated without being to blame.

ugly1. An ugly baby makes a beautiful adult. Rec. dist.: N.C.

2. An ugly man never gets a pretty wife. Rec. dist.: N.C.

3. An ugly woman dreads the mirror. Rec. dist.: Ill.

4. If all the world were ugly, deformity would be no monster. Rec. dist.: Ill.

5. If you despise that which is ugly, you do not know that which is beautiful. Rec. dist.: Ill.

6. No woman is ugly if she is well dressed. Rec. dist.: Ill.

7. The ugliest woman can look in the mirror and think she is beautiful. Rec. dist.: N.C.

8. Ugly is to the bone; beauty lasts only a day. Ugly holds its own--you never can tell. Rec. dist.: N.Y., Wis.1st cit.: 1881 Evans, Leicestershire Words.20c. coll.: Stevenson 140:5.

SEE ALSO Old woman's GOLD is not ugly. / There are not ugly LOVES, nor handsome prisons. / Nobody's SWEETHEART is ugly.

ulcer An ulcer and a bird do not choose where to appear. Rec. dist.: Ill.

umbrage Umbrage should never be taken where offense is not intended. Rec. dist.: Mich.

umbrella1. If you leave your umbrella at home, it is sure to rain. Rec. dist.: Mich., N.Y., S.C.1st cit.:US1907 Burgess, Are You a Bromide?20c. coll.: Stevenson 2405: 10.

2. The umbrella goes up when the rain comes down. Rec. dist.: Ont.

3. Two under an umbrella makes the third a wet fellow. Rec. dist.: Fla.

SEE ALSO COMPROMISE makes a good umbrella but a poor roof. / A WISE man always carries his umbrella.

un-American SEE IMPOSSIBLE is un-American.

unanimity Unanimity makes humble help strong. Rec. dist.: N.Y.

unbelievingSEE BELIEVING has a core of unbelieving.

unbestowedSEE The worst STORE is a maid unbestowed.

unbiddenSEE An unbidden GUEST knows not where to sit.

unborn A boy is better unborn than untaught. Vars.:(a) Better be unborn than unbred. (b) Better be unborn than untaught, for ignorance is the root of misfortune. Rec. dist.: U.S., Can.1st cit.:ca 1275 Proverbs of Alfred, ed. Skeat; US1933 Phillpotts, Captain's Curio. 20c. coll.: ODEP56, Whiting ( MP) 656, Stevenson 2286:6.

uncalledSEE OLD age comes uncalled.

uncertainSEE Where the LAW is uncertain there is no law.

uncertaintySEE POVERTY with security is better than plenty in the midst of fear and uncertainty.

unchaste1. The unchaste woman can never become chaste again. Rec. dist.: Ill.

2. The unchaste woman will hesitate at no wickedness. Rec. dist.: Ill.

underSEE There is nothing NEW under the sun.

underdoneSEE OVERDONE is worse than underdone.

understand1. A man doesn't learn to understand anything unless he loves it. Rec. dist.: Ont.

2. A person should not meddle with what he does not understand. Rec. dist.: Ont.

3. He that understands amiss, concludes worse. Rec. dist.: Mich.

4. He who understands most is the other men's master. Rec. dist.: Wis.

-623-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Dictionary of American Proverbs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • A 3
  • B 33
  • C 79
  • D 133
  • E 173
  • F 193
  • G 245
  • I 323
  • J 337
  • K 345
  • L 357
  • M 395
  • N 423
  • O 435
  • P 447
  • Q 493
  • R 497
  • S 521
  • T 579
  • U 623
  • V 629
  • W 637
  • Y 685
  • Z 689
  • Bibliography 691
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 718

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.