Major Speeches and Debates of Senator Joe McCarthy Delivered in the United States Senate, 1950-1951

By Joseph McCarthy | Go to book overview

JULY 12, 1950
Statement of Four Individuals on State Department Personnel Files; Analysis of Senator Tydings' Statement to Press Regarding State Department Files

Mr. MCCARTHY. I shall need only about 5 minutes to present my remarks, and then I shall yield the floor.

Mr. President, this morning I sent to the President of the United States a letter and the photostats of six documents. I felt that this material might be of some interest to the Senate, and, therefore, I sent to the Senate Chamber copies of each of the photostats and copies of the letter to the President, with the request that a copy of each be placed upon the desk of each Senator.

I understand that copies were placed upon the desks of all Republican Senators, but that the clerk for the majority, upon the advice of the Democratic majority leader, the Senator from Illinois [Mr. LUCAS], decided not to place copies on the desks of the Democratic Senators.

Mr. President, I think this material is certainly not of such nature that it should be restricted to only one of the parties. I believe it is certainly of Just as much interest--and perhaps more 80--to the Democrats as it is to the Republicans. Therefore, in view of the fact that I was unable to have this material placed on the desks of Democratic Senators, I intend to read some of it into the RECORD.

Mr. President, there has been considerable discussion pro and con as to the condition of the State Department's socalled loyalty files, and in the minds of many persons there has been considerable question as to whether or not the so-called loyalty program is working adequately.

The Presiding Officer will recall that the grand jury which recently was dismissed in New York discussed the subject in some detail, and pointed out that the loyalty program was most inadequate to protect the security of the Nation.

I have before me, Mr. President, four affidavits which are of a rather startling nature. These affidavits were made by persons who had nothing to gain by making them. In fact, one of the individuals, who is now working in the State Department, runs the risk of losing his Job if his name becomes known.

One statement which I shall read was made by a person employed in the State Department. Another affidavit is by a young man who is now working for Sears, Roebuck & Co., and, I believe, going to school on the side. The third affidavit was made by a young man who is now a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and who also worked for the State Department for some time. The fourth affidavit was made by a young man who is in the Foreign Service School at Georgetown University, and who also worked for the State Department for some time.

Mr. President, as the Senate will recall, in the latter half of 1946 it became general knowledge that the President was about to inaugurate or put into effect a loyalty program. At that time the attention of Congress and of the country was focused upon this subject of Communists and disloyal people in the Government by the Marzani case. The Senate will recall that Marzani was a high State Department employee who was convicted in connection with his communistic activities.

At that time, the President--and wisely so, I believe--commenced planning a loyalty program, apparently for the purpose of avoiding future Marzanis within the State Department and within other branches of the Government. That Presidential order was signed early In 1947. The Congress appropriated $11,000,000 to implement the Executive order. We find from these affidavits that when it became known that the President was about to inaugurate a loyalty program, someone within the State Department--and, as of this time, I do not know who-- initiated the most fantastic project I have ever heard of. He hired a total of at least eight individuals, four of whom made affidavits which are now in my possession. The task of those individuals was to go to the files, and, using their own Judgment, to destroy and to tear from the files any material of a derogatory nature, either insofar as the communistic activities, morals, or

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