Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African-American Voices

By Shelley Fisher Fishkin | Go to book overview

Works Cited

Abrahams, Roger D. Deep Down in the Jungle: Negro Narrative Folklore from the Streets of Philadelphia. [ 1964]. rev. ed. Chicago: Aldine, 1970.

_____. Positively Black. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1970.

Abrahams, Roger D., and John Szwed. "Introduction". In After Africa: Extracts from British Travel Accounts and Journals of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries Concerning the Slaves, Their Manners, and Customs in the British West Indies, 1-48. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983.

Albert, Ethel M. "'Rhetoric,' 'Logic,' and 'Poetics' in Burundi: Culture Patterning of Speech Behavior". In "The Ethnography of Communication", edited by John J. Gumperz and Dell Hymes. American Anthropologist 66, pt. 2 ( Special issue, 1964): 35-54.

Aldrich, Mrs. Thomas Bailey. Crowding Memories. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1920.

Alleyne, Mervyn C. Comparative Afro-American: An Historical Comparative Study of English-Based Afro-American Dialects of the New World. Foreword by Ian F. Hancock. Linguistica Extranea, Studia II. Ann Arbor: Karoma Publishers, Inc., 1980.

Alter, Robert. Rogue's Progress: Study in the Picaresque Novel, 117-21. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1964.

Ames, Russell. "Protest and Irony in Negro Folksong". Science and Society 14 ( 1950): 193-213. Reprinted in Dundes, Alan, ed., Mother Wit from the Laughing Barrel, 487-500. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990.

Andrews, Ethan A. Slavery and the Domestic Slave Trade in the United States. Boston: Light and Stearns, 1836.

Andrews, Sidney. The South Since the War: As Shown by Fourteen Weeks of Travel and Observation in Georgia and the Carolinas. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1866. Reprint. New York:Arno Press and the New York Times, 1969.

Andrews, William L. "Charles W. Chesnutt". In Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, edited by Charles Wilson Reagan and William Ferris, 202-3. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989.

_____. "Mark Twain and James W. C. Pennington: Huckleberry Finn's Smallpox Lie". Studies in American Fiction 9 ( Spring 1981): 103-12.

_____. "Mark Twain, William Wells Brown, and the Problem of Authority in New South Writing". In Southern Literature and Literary Theory, edited by Jefferson Humphries, 1-21. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1990.

_____. Personal communication, 22 June 1992.

Anon. "Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms to the State of California". Alta California, 4 December 1879, 1.

-219-

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Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African-American Voices
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • Part One - Jimmy 11
  • 1 13
  • 2 41
  • Part Two - Jerry 51
  • 3 53
  • 4 68
  • Part Three - Jim 77
  • 5 79
  • 6 93
  • Part Four - Break Dancing in the Drawing Room 109
  • 7 111
  • 8 121
  • 9 128
  • Coda 145
  • Notes 147
  • Works Cited 219
  • Sociable Jimmy 249
  • Index 253
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