Selling War: The British Propaganda Campaign against American "Neutrality" in World War II

By Nicholas John Cull | Go to book overview

5
"Give Us the Tools . . .": British Propaganda and American Aid, January to August 1941

Here is the answer that I will give to President Roosevelt: Put your
confidence in us. Give us your faith and your blessing, and, under
Providence, all will be well . . . . Give us the tools and we will
finish the job.

Winston Churchill, February 9, 19411

The first weeks of 1941 brought a new dawn in Anglo-American relations. On January 6, 1941, Roosevelt publicly pledged himself to an "all inclusive national defense" and "full support" for the Allied cause. Congress replied with the Lend-Lease bill. Britain breathed a sigh of relief. There were also signs of a new era in Anglo-American diplomacy. Joseph Kennedy resigned from the American Embassy in London and was replaced by the internationalist John Gilbert Winant. Roosevelt also sent his trusted aide Harry Hopkins on a six-week mission to Britain. The British pulled out all the stops to impress their guest. Charmed, Hopkins assured Washington that it could work well with the Churchill government. 2 Unfortunately, Britain's chief new arrival in Washington proved rather less successful.

Lord Halifax began his mission to Washington in style, steaming into Chesapeake Bay aboard the Royal Navy's newest battleship, King George V. From this point, however, his mission went rapidly downhill. He was baffled by his new surroundings, and a frost fell over his dealings with the U.S. government. Ill-considered remarks and an incautious visit to Congress soon set isolationist alarm bells clanging. Startled, Halifax retreated into "Political Purdah" until the Lend-Lease bill had passed. Other British arrivals fared better. A delegation from the British Chiefs of Staff began vigorous talks with their American counterparts

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selling War: The British Propaganda Campaign against American "Neutrality" in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.