From Submission to Rebellion: The Provinces Versus the Center in Russia

By Vladimir Shlapentokh; Roman Levita et al. | Go to book overview

17
REGIONS IN COALITION AGAINST THE CENTER

In their permanent confrontation with the center, open or hidden, regions resort, as in any game with a number of participants, to forming coalitions among themselves. National Bodies Representing the Provinces Russian regions created a number of organizations that strengthened their power in the struggle for dominance with the center. Many of these organizations, as a result of the convoluted character of the Russian political processes, even emerged at the initiative of the Kremlin, which always tried to use any political organization as its own instrument of power.

In 1992, at the very beginning of the center-periphery confrontation, there emerged, as previously mentioned, an organization of Russian regional leaders called the Association of Governors, which began to play a visible political role in the country.1 In their turn, many presidents of non-Russian republics actively supported the Council of Republican Leaders.2 Irregular meetings of the heads of the national republics were also held, creating another in which they could communicate and cooperate in the elaboration of a common policy toward Moscow.3

More important, there were similar bodies that emerged in the Russian Parliament. Various factions in the Duma thought it important to defend regional interests and joined the emerging movement Russian Regions in 1995.4

However, the most important body representing the regions came to be the Federal Council, which consists of two representatives from each region in the Russian Federation, as discussed earlier.

-195-

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