Israel, Land of Tradition and Conflict

By Bernard Reich; Gershon R. Kieval | Go to book overview

4
Politics

The provisional government of Israel, formed at independence and recognized by the major powers, was new in name only. It had begun to function de facto following adoption of the United Nations partition resolution in November 1947 and it drew on the experience gained by the Yishuv during the mandatory period. In the fall of 1947, when the United Nations was considering the future of the Palestine mandate, the Jewish Agency Executive and the Vaad Leumi (the National Council of the Yishuv) formed a Joint Emergency Committee to prepare and arrange for the transfer of power from the British mandatory administration to the government of the proposed Jewish state. Among other activities, that committee drafted a legal code and a proposed constitution, developed a roster of experienced civil servants willing to serve the future government, and instituted recruitment for the Hagana to preserve the security of the Jewish community. The scope of the advance planning was broad and included many of the tasks of the new state, such as blueprints for the proposed ministries and their personnel, as well as substantial consideration of the policies to be pursued.

Shortly after the partition vote, the United Nations established a Palestine Commission to effect the transfer from the mandatory power to the proposed Arab and Jewish states. Lacking cooperation from the Arabs and the British, that body worked almost exclusively with the Jewish community. In March 1948 a temporary National Council of State, chosen from the National Council and Jewish Agency Executive, assumed control in many areas of Palestine. On May 14, the provisional government proclaimed Israel's independence, repealed the British mandatory restrictions on immigration and the sale of land, and converted the Hagana into the Defense Army of Israel.

The provisional government had three elements: a state council that acted as parliament, a cabinet elected by the state council from among its

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Israel, Land of Tradition and Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Westview Profiles · Nations of The Contemporary Middle East ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 2- History 37
  • 3- The Economy 65
  • 4- Politics 85
  • 5- The Quest for Peace And Security 139
  • 6- Israel and the United States 187
  • Chronology of Major Events 203
  • Acronyms 211
  • Suggested Readings 213
  • About the Book and Authors 221
  • Index 223
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