Israel, Land of Tradition and Conflict

By Bernard Reich; Gershon R. Kieval | Go to book overview

6
Israel and the United States

The United States and Israel have been linked in a complex and multifaceted "special relationship" that had its origins prior to the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948. The relationship has focused on the continuing U.S. support for the survival, security, and well-being of Israel but alterations have occurred in all areas of interaction between the two states and during the tenures of all U.S. administrations and Israeli governments.


POLITICAL AND STRATEGIC CONSIDERATIONS

In the earliest years the United States remained very much aloof from Israel in the strategic-military sector. The United States declared an arms embargo on December 5, 1947; there was practically no U.S. military aid or sales of military equipment; and no formal, or even informal, military agreement or strategic cooperation between the two states. Extensive dealings in the strategic realm became significant only in the 1970s and 1980s.

During the first decades after Israel's independence, the U.S.-Israel relationship was grounded primarily in humanitarian concerns (for example, the immediate post-World War IITruman administration focus on Holocaust survivors), in religious and historical links, and in a moralemotional-political arena rather than a strategic-military one. The concept of Israel as a "strategic asset" was more of an outcome of the developing relationship than a foundation for its establishment. The two states developed a diplomatic-political relationship that focused on the need to resolve the Arab-Israeli dispute, but while they agreed on the general concept, they often differed on the precise means of achieving the desired result. The relationship became especially close after the Six Day War, when a congruence of policy prevailed on many of their salient concerns. Nevertheless, the two states often held differing perspectives on regional

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Israel, Land of Tradition and Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Westview Profiles · Nations of The Contemporary Middle East ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 2- History 37
  • 3- The Economy 65
  • 4- Politics 85
  • 5- The Quest for Peace And Security 139
  • 6- Israel and the United States 187
  • Chronology of Major Events 203
  • Acronyms 211
  • Suggested Readings 213
  • About the Book and Authors 221
  • Index 223
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