Public Opinion and Foreign Policy

By Lester Markel; Council on Foreign Relations. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER S+.EVEN 1
CHART OF THE COLD WAR

By Shepard Stone

THE JOB of enlightenment confronting the United States abroad is complex and elusive. It is far easier to supply the physical wants of hundreds of millions of men and women, still carrying burdens left by the war, than to win them over psychologically.

American production, American dollars, wheat, automobiles and machinery undoubtedly constitute a mighty force in helping to create good will toward us. Nevertheless, despite American aid flowing to many countries, there is considerable suspicion abroad of our motives and perplexity about our policies. In every European country there is a latent anti-American feeling compounded of envy and fear, and the Communists make the most of this situation.

In Asia, too, the job before us is becoming increasingly complex. Here are hundreds of millions of people, living largely in poverty, who seek a minimum of economic security and also independence of the white colonial powers. Here is rich ground for Communism.

All over the world, it becomes more and more apparent, the same basic conflict is developing. For the present, still, the primary area is Europe, and it is there that the heaviest efforts in the propaganda battle have been made. For that

____________________
1
This chapter as well as chapters eight, nine and ten are based in part on reports from thirty-four American correspondents in Europe of the New York Times, the New York Herald Tribune, the National Broadcasting Company, the olumbia Broadcasting System and Time, Inc. Their names and organizations are listed on p. x.

-143-

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