Drugs: Medical, Psychological and Social Facts

By Peter Laurie | Go to book overview

6
Speed

'Amphetamines, amphetamines? I do wish, Mr Er, you would not constantly confuse me with these new technical terms. Are these what we used to call "pills" in connection with juveniles?' Stipendiary Magistrate, February 1966.

The pharmacological action of this class of drug is relatively simple. By stimulating the central nervous system it produces euphoria, self-confidence, energy, alertness and endurance. There are about fifteen brands of amphetamine licitly available in England; the most common of these used illicitly, with their slang names, are: Benzedrine - bennies, Dexedrine - dexy, Methedrine - meths, Durophet - black bombers, and Steladex.

Another group combines amphetamine in a mixture with barbiturate, compounding the problems of both. The principal example is Drinamyl - whose former distinctive shape gave its name, purple hearts; now in a new, non-heart shape, French blue. All of these except Durophet are manufactured by one firm, Smith Klein and French of Welwyn Garden City, which provides the bulk of the National Health Services amphetamine supplies.

Amphetamine was first prepared in 1887, and as Benzedrine, was first used medically in 1935 for the treatment of narcolepsy. The first non-medical use was in ships' survival packs during the Spanish Civil War; at about the same time it was issued to German paratroops for routine operational use. Both sides had it during the Second World War. Seventy-two million tablets were issued to British forces to be used tactically to keep troops in the line when they, and the other side too, would normally have been too exhausted to fight. Amphetamines were to be 'withheld until the men were markedly fatigued physically or mentally, in circumstances calling for a special effort'. The maximum military doses were 10 mg. in twelve hours, or 30 mg. in a week - roughly the ordinary teenager's weekend dose, but one fourth of the

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Drugs: Medical, Psychological and Social Facts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Pelican Books Drugs 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • 1 - The Meaning of Drug 9
  • 2 - Archetypal Heroin 15
  • 3 - The Psychology of the Addict 37
  • 4 - Attitudes to Opiates 48
  • 5 - Sleepers 64
  • 6 - Speed 73
  • 7 - The Weed 85
  • 8 - Hallucinogens 102
  • 9 - Lsd Applied 116
  • 10 - Identification, Cure and the End of Addiction 134
  • 11 - Control of Drugs 152
  • References 179
  • Index 187
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.