The Negotiation of Cultural Identity: Perceptions of European Americans and African Americans

By Ronald L. Jackson II | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Two Theories of
Communicated Identity

Two existing paradigms form the core of this investigation: the third culture building model and the communication theory of ethnic identity. Chapter 1 identified the elements to be applied here from each paradigm, the following explanation gives a full description of each perspective.


THIRD CULTURE BUILDING

This model was developed in the early 1990s by a communication professor, William Starosta, and his graduate student at the time, Anthony Olorunnisola, at Howard University; prior to the study presented in this book it had not been empirically tested or verified. The achieved objective of these scholars was to provide an heuristic advancement in the study of intercultural communication. The meta-model is quite reminiscent of language metamorphosis, in that all languages are said to be "pidgins" in their infancy stages of development and then to mature into "creoles"; subsequently they become a fully functional language.

The process here appears to be a communicologist's reinterpretation of that metaphorphosis, in addition to a combination of equity theory and a phenomenological approach to the study of intercultural communication. Nonetheless, this nascent metatheory, Third Culture Building (TCB), should be lauded for its recognition that intercultural communication encompasses several gradations ranging from micro (individual) to macro (societal) levels of communication analysis. According to Hecht et al. ( 1993), identity exists on multiple levels as well (see Figure 5.1) and deserves an identical examination, one that is contextually based, in order to include the back and forth movement of identity-shifting. One of the contributions the TCB model makes is to specify the levels of communication -- intracultural, interpersonal, rhetorical, and mass media. These sub-disciplinary perspectives are included in a comprehensive framework for examining "A process by which two or more entities come to take account of each other, to extract and to process messages

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Negotiation of Cultural Identity: Perceptions of European Americans and African Americans
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 123

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.