CHAPTER V
THE FURNISHINGS OF THE TOMBS

TURNING our attention to the more personal details pertaining to the disposal of the dead, we find that the two fundamentally different customs of inhumation and cremation were practised in Etruria throughout its whole history. Nothing could be simpler than one form of burial: the dead man was taken on his chariot-bier to the home-like room prepared for him, and there he was laid reverently on what represented the bed in his home. This might be just a plain bench cut out in the rock, or a more realistic imitation of a couch carved in the stone, or it might even be his own iron or bronze bedstead, as it was in the rare instance seen in the Regolini-Galassi grave at Caere (p. 133). The warrior, who would be also priest and prince, lay clad in his armour, whilst his weapons were disposed conveniently around him. The princess must wear her richest gold-spangled gown, and the treasures from her jewel-case must lie ready for her choosing. Her little table with toilet accessories was often placed by her side, and her favourite pieces of silver and bronze hung on the walls of her new room.

The words of Signor Avvolta, a resident in Tarquinia, as quoted by George Dennis, give in most graphic style his experience as discoverer of a virgin tomb on the Monterozzi. His find was made accidentally when, as he was taking stones from a small tumulus, he peered underneath a slab which turned out to be part of the roof of a tomb: 'I beheld a warrior stretched on a

-66-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Etruria: Past and Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.