The Philosophy of Thomas Jefferson

By Adrienne Koch | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, John, correspondence with, 33, 38, 54, 62, 98, 100, 109, 113, 121, 127; opinion of French atheists, 95 Agriculture, in favor of, 22, 172 f., 184; addition of useful plants to, 190
Alembert, Jean le R., d', 28, 35, 48
"American experiment, the:" Jefferson's belief in, and contribution to, 186; an example to the world, 187 American Indians, 18, 21, 92f., 116; vocabularies, 93
American Register, 63
American speech, 110
Ampère, André Marie, 65, 75
Analyse de Dupuys ( Tracy), 58
Aristotle, 42, 79
Asylum, right of, 21n, 22
Atheists, 28, 95 f., 102
Autobiography ( Jefferson), 124, 142, 189; excerpts, 133, 135, 143
Bacon, 50, 66, 69, 72; classification of faculties of the mind, 48, 105
Banneker, Benjamin, 118
Beauty and Virtue ( Hutcheson), 16
Beccaria, Cesare Bonesane, quoted, 166
Becker, Carl, quoted, 137n
Benevolence, 25, 30
Bentham, Jeremy, 20
Berkeley, George, 35, 75, 100
Bertrand, Alexis, 87, 88n
"Bible of the Atheists," 97; see System of Nature
Bibliography, 191-99
Bill for Proportioning Crimes and Punishments, 143n, 190
Bill for the More General Diffusion of Knowledge, 7, 21, 166
Bill of Rights, 161
Biology, ideology placed in the context of zoology, 67, 72, 113
Biran, Maine de, 65, 75
Blackwell, Thomas, 124
Bolingbroke, Henry St. John, philosophy of, and Jefferson, 10-13, 125
Buffon, Comte de, 47, 92
Bureaucracy and privilege, 174, 188
Burlamaqui, Jean Jacques, 147, 148
Cabanis, P. J. G., 20, 55, 56, 57, 66, 113, 120; methodological materialism, 83- 88, 97, 114
Cabell, Joseph C., 162, 168
Carr, Peter, 1n, 7n, 16, 29
Cause in society, 124
Causes, Cabanis's position on first, 84; on final, 86, 87
Certainty and error, 77 f.
Channing, William E., 137n
Characteristics, The . . . ( Shaftesbury), 15
Charron, Pierre, 106
Chinard, Gilbert, 3n, 59, 65n; The Literary Bible of Thomas Jefferson . . . , 1n, 2, 9, 23n; quoted, 2, 4, 7, 129
Christianity, moral teachings found in, 2, 4, 8, 12, 23 ff., 42; Bolingbroke's views, 11 ff.; reconciliation of "essential," with scientific and social philosophy, 104; Unitarianism, 137n; see also Jesus: Religion
Church and State, separation of, 7
Cincinnati, the, 150
Citizens, act concerning . . . , 189
Classes, Jefferson's attitudes toward, 170 ff.; laboring class, 170; landholders, 171; manufacturers, 173; importance of class opposition, 174; Tracy's ideas about relations between, 182-85
Classics, Greek and Roman, 1, 7, 9, 31, 115
Classification of the realm of mind, 111; Baconian, 48, 105-8 Classifications, Tracy's criticism of, 79
Colleges, curricula, 48, 58, 107; text books for, 56, 64, 154, 167
Commentary and Review of Montesquieu ( Tracy), 56-64 passim; with excerpts, 157 ff., 166; Jefferson opinion of, quoted, 154n, 155

-201-

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