Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints

By William Lazer; Eugene J. Kelley | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

It has been argued here that the modern marketing concept serves very naturally to describe an important facet of all organizational activity. All organizations must develop appropriate products to serve their sundry consuming groups and must use modern tools of communication to reach their consuming publics. The business heritage of marketing provides a useful set of concepts for guiding all organizations.

The choice facing those who manage nonbusiness organizations is not whether to market or not to market, for no organization can avoid marketing. The choice is whether to do it well or poorly, and on this necessity the case for organizational marketing is basically founded.

What are a banker's opinions concerning the emerging discipline of social marketing? Is there more to the case for "social responsibilities" than simply minimizing the pressure of government regulations and of consumer advocates? Long-term social benefits and economic profits can accrue to business and society as a result of the adoption of socially responsible business policies by corporate enterprise.


4. ECONOMIC MAN vs. SOCIAL MAN*

David P. Eastburnt

With so much attention focused on violence in many of our city streets, there is danger of losing sight of a desperate conflict underlying much of the violence. This is the conflict between Economic Man and Social Man.

Each of us, of course, is both Economic and Social Man. Each of us is concerned with making a living and with living with his fellows, but the mix varies, and it is there that the source of conflict lies. Those who are 90 percent Economic Man see today's world differently from those who are 90 percent Social Man. Many, in whom the proportions more nearly approach 50-50, are torn apart by conflicting beliefs. And

____________________
*
Reprinted from "Economic Man vs. Social Man," Series for Economic Education, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, 1970.
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, President.

-42-

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