Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints

By William Lazer; Eugene J. Kelley | Go to book overview
Fourth, the new generation of corporate executives (e.g., the new members of the Committee for Economic Development, who have shown an extraordinary grasp of the expanding opportunities and responsibilities of corporate citizenship) will insist on new and higher levels of marketing integrity. Under their enlightened direction, marketing will find profit, as well as other satisfactions, in greater public service.
Fifth, I believe 1968 will mark marketing's turning point in its attitude toward consumerism. And none too soon. The time is already late.

How can one account for the growing impact of consumerism? The author discusses examples of some corporate and governmental responses, many of which are simple and straight-forward, yet surprisingly effective. Consumerism is, after all, only an appeal to sound marketing practice and high standards of business. Marketing students should understand that the growing impact of consumerism on marketing-government relationships offers an exceptional opportunity for business renewal.


14. THE GROWING IMPACT OF CONSUMERISM ON MARKETING- GOVERNMENT RELATIONSHIPS*

Virginia Knauer

Consumerism is increasing government's role in marketing. That may sound ominous, but it is not necessarily so. Nor need it be. Whether the increasing role will be directed towards stimulating workable competition, competition which meets the goals and values of society or simply directed toward greater restriction of marketing practices, is in large part dependent upon how marketers and students of marketing view consumerism. To understand consumerism is to explore questions of responsiveness posed by consumers both to government and business.

A common viewpoint of consumerism is that it is synonymous with

____________________
*
Not previously published.
Special assistant to President Nixon for Consumer Affairs and Director, Office of Consumer Affairs.

-147-

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