Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints

By William Lazer; Eugene J. Kelley | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

The burdens for servicing goods under warranty are multiplying rapidly. With the rate of increase in automobile population outstripping that in human population, and with over 800 million appliances in use in the United States, the short-run advantages of using warranties as a come-on to make sales hardly seems worth the price that industry will be forced to pay as a result of the popular outcry against malpractices. Following the warranty program guidelines outlined here can stimulate repeat sales and word of mouth recommendation by satisfied customers. Such guidelines can aid in designing advertising and promotion campaigns, in pricing repair services, wording the warranties themselves, and making adjustments either at no cost to the consumer or on the basis of a service contract charge. If manufacturers individually and collectively do not recognize the legitimate claims of consumers, there is ample evidence that the Congress, regardless of which political party is in power, may be obliged to do so as the result of mounting public frustration with haphazard warranty service after sale.

The self-service mode of shopping has resulted in the package becoming more important to the consumer as an information source. The author indicates that both shopping behavior and the package-shopper relationship must be studied before additional packaging regulations are imposed. He considers three recommendations which will facilitate the elimination of deceptive practices.


33. THE PACKAGE, LEGISLATION, AND THE SHOPPER*

David M. Gardner

In the last few years, such terms as "deceptive packaging," "mislabeling," "short weights," "nonexistent price reductions," "false advertising," and "truth-in-packaging" have become all too common in the field of marketing. The concern has been that potentially unethical practices

____________________
*
Reprinted from "The Package, Legislation, and the Shopper," Business Horizons, Vol. II ( October 1968), pp. 53-58.
University of Illinois.

-386-

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