Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints

By William Lazer; Eugene J. Kelley | Go to book overview

ability to screen advertising content that comes their way? Rather than allowing the consumer's interest to be represented by business or consumer advocates, the consumer's own voice should play an important part in the making of public policy decisions regarding advertising's role in society.


35. ADVERTISING: ATTACKS AND COUNTERS

Stephen A. Greyser

The fall 1971 Federal Trade Commission hearings on "modern advertising practices" have raised new questions and issues regarding the impacts of advertising in our society. Included are such matters as advertising's persuasive abilities, the truthfulness of its content, its tastefulness, and its cultural impacts of our values and lifestyles.

Most readers' familiarity with these issues and their related allegations signals the fact that such criticism of advertising is hardly a new phenomenon. However, the current wave of critical comment seems more strident and pervasive--much akin to advertising itself. It is reflected in less favorable attitudes toward advertising on the part of businessmen and the public. Further, such criticism is often accompanied by recommendations for regulation which bid to inhibit some of advertising's most cherished practices, perhaps most notably that of puffery and exaggeration which to some represent the poetic essence of advertising but to many critics seem little short of outright fabrication.

The public policy proposals and rulings accompanying the criticism have in turn spawned further industry self-regulatory efforts. Particularly in view of the spate of external and internal regulatory activity, this is an appropriate time to make a systematic examination of the social impacts of advertising. More specifically, let us consider certain questions:

What do we really know about advertising's social impacts?

Is there a sensible overall structure for considering them?

Can we explain the misunderstandings over them that divide advertising's advocates and critics?

Most important for businessmen, what are the implications of the criticisms and the resultant regulatory actions and proposals?

In this Special Report, I shall address myself to these specific ques-

____________________
*
Reprinted from "Advertising: ,"Attacks and Counters Harvard Business Review, Vol. 50 ( March-April 1972), pp. 22-36.
Harvard Business School.

-400-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 510

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.