Social Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints

By William Lazer; Eugene J. Kelley | Go to book overview

Finally, in the long run, marketers should be more concerned with processes of consumer learning. Research into these processes could provide a sound basis both for industry self-regulation and for marketer- initiated consumer education programs for children. Such efforts, in turn, would counter a key criticism of children's advertising, reinforce the implicit "bargain" with parents, and contribute to the development of more skilled, and perhaps more satisfied adult consumers.

As a result of changing social values and expressed consumer activism, consumer research must now provide a two-way channel of interaction between the consumer and the firm. The author contends that consumer research should not only facilitate the marketer's awareness of consumer wants and needs, but should in addition provide the consumer with an opportunity and channel to assess the marketers performance from the consumers perspective.


38. POINT OF VIEW: CONSUMERISM AND CONSUMER RESEARCH*

A. B. Blankenship

Consumerism is having a massive impact on our society, not least of all upon consumer research. It is time that those of us in the business sit back and study (or worry) about how we had better be reacting.

For the audience of this publication, there is no need to define consumerism, or to talk about its impact upon society generally. The Ralph Naders have done this dramatically for us. They have pretty definitely shown us that business does not understand the consumer. That goes for the consumer researcher, too, who ought to know better. Consumer research is supposedly the channel for communication from the consumer to business. But we in consumer research, unfortunately, may understand neither the consumer nor his viewpoint.

Interest in the consumer is not new to consumer research. Most codes of ethics for researchers who deal with the consumer say--and have

____________________
*
Reprinted from "Point of View: ,"Consumerism and Consumer Research Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 11 ( August 1971), pp. 44-47.
Bowling Green State University.

-436-

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