His Last Bow: Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; Owen Dudley Edwards | Go to book overview

The Devil's Foot

IN recording from time to time some of the curious experiences and interesting recollections which I associate with my long and intimate friendship with Mr Sherlock Holmes, I have continually been faced by difficulties caused by his own aversion to publicity. To his sombre and cynical spirit all popular applause was always abhorrent, and nothing amused him more at the end of a successful case than to hand over the actual exposure to some orthodox official, and to listen with a mocking smile to the general chorus of misplaced congratulation. It was indeed this attitude upon the part of my friend, and certainly not any lack of interesting material, which has caused me of late years to lay very few of my records before the public. My participation in some of his adventures was always a privilege which entailed discretion and reticence upon me.

It was, then, with considerable surprise that I received a telegram from Holmes last Tuesday--he has never been known to write where a telegram would serve--in the following terms: 'Why not tell them of the Cornish horror-- strangest case I have handled.' I have no idea what backward sweep of memory had brought the matter fresh to his mind, or what freak had caused him to desire that I should recount it; but I hasten, before another cancelling telegram may arrive, to hunt out the notes which give me the exact details of the case, and to lay the narrative before my readers.

It was, then, in the spring of the year 1897 that Holmes's iron constitution showed some symptoms of giving way in the face of constant hard work of a most exacting kind, aggravated, perhaps, by occasional indiscretions of his own.* In March of that year Dr Moore Agar, of Harley Street,* whose dramatic introduction to Holmes I may some day recount, gave positive injunctions that the famous private

-68-

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His Last Bow: Some Reminiscences of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxvi
  • Select Bibliography xxxvii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xliii
  • Preface 3
  • Wisteria Lodge 5
  • The Bruce-Partington Plans 37
  • The Devil's Foot 68
  • The Red Circle 95
  • The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax 116
  • The Dying Detective 138
  • His Last Bow 155
  • Explanatory Notes 173
  • Appendix Three Unsigned Pieces by P. G. Wodehouse 244
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