Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success

By Richard S. Prentis | Go to book overview

Preface

Many of us have a desire for some inexplicable reason to write a book. I suppose basically we feel we have a story to tell. Our story arises from where we are coming: professional writers for the money--philosophers to explain belief systems--historians to delineate the past--psychologists to discuss behavior--economists to translate the movement of money-- movie stars, celebrities, and now politicians to tell their story known as "kiss and tell."

My reason was to present the life event of retirement as a basis for guidance to those men and women thinking about their future years.

My belief was threefold that future retirees would benefit from my innovative approach to the subject of retirement. First, the fact that I had retired provided hands-on contact with the problems and promises of retirement. Second, my research in the field indicated a need to relate the retirement experience, not from a cohort or statistical standpoint, but rather from the richness of an individual's recollection. Finally, I believe the shared trials, tribulations and triumphs of other retirees suggest approaches to the transition from work to retirement.

Since, to my knowledge, there is no book on the market that addresses retirement in an individual, personal manner, I have gone to the source, actual retirees, to learn of their experiences expressed in their own words.

These conversations provide an opportunity for the reader to share the sentiments of others as they considered leaving their jobs, making the decision to retire, and details of their lives in retirement. Each interview is followed by a short analysis of a salient point arising from the retiree's

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.