Passages of Retirement: Personal Histories of Struggle and Success

By Richard S. Prentis | Go to book overview

36
Leisure Activities in
Retirement

We all walk to different drummers when we decide what we will do with our time in retirement. No one can tell us what to do that will provide pleasure and purpose. This necessarily requires an independent decision.

If, for instance, you enjoy making lists--take the cleaning. . . . pick up dog food . . . get the car washed . . . cut the grass . . . have your hair done . . . send another toy to your grandchild . . . have someone, anyone clean the basement--then make your list and enjoy yourself. Or if you like watching sports on television, or game shows or soaps, go ahead and have a good time, you have earned it.

The following interviews provide some guidance for our own selection. We see where some leisure interests are a carryover from the retiree's working days, i.e., the "fire-buff" and the golfer. Others--engaged in new interests--discovered pleasurable use of their time in volunteer service; politics; the simple, but joyful, routine of walking in the neighborhood; and pursuing further education in a new field which led to part-time work.

The basis for our choice of leisure activities often relates in a fundamental way, whether we are free or enmeshed in the Chronological Trap.


THE CHRONOLOGICAL TRAP

Have you ever thought about taking flying lessons, bicycling about the United States, going to college for the first or second time, studying the

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