The Influence of Grenville on Pitt's Foreign Policy, 1787-1798

By Ephraim Douglass Adams | Go to book overview

THE RESULTS OF GRENVILLE'S VICTORY.

Malmesbury's estimate of the changed sentiment of the English nation was not a mistaken one. The résumé of the Lille negotiations, drawn up by Grenville and presented to Parliament November 3, was received with favor,* and the government now bent all its energies toward preparation for a continuance of the war with France. An address to the throne, November 8, pledged the British nation to unremitting hostility to the expansion of French power, and in the attendant debate Grenville stood forward as the great champion of patriotic England. His speech contained no word of regret for the failure of peace negotiations; he rejoiced, rather, that now at last all men must see the desperate determination of France to overthrow the constitution and law of England. Pitt's speech in the Commons on November 10 was much less vigorous; but while "lamenting and deploring" the failure to secure peace, he acknowledged that he had gone too far in his original offer to France and explicitly stated that he could not now regard that peace as honorable which involved a retrocession of all that England had acquired. The address to the throne was passed in both houses without division § and was soon followed by the preparation of measures intended to arouse the inherent patriotism of the people, to appeal to the nation in fact as France had appealed to its people, but on different lines and for a different purpose. The organization of the volunteer forces was the first step which was taken in this direction, and its great popularity furnished excellent proof of the political wisdom of Grenville's stubborn opposition to peace. In his own department Grenville resumed his customary activity in diplomatic correspondence, interest in which had lagged during the negotiations at Lille.

____________________
*
Parl. Hist., XXXIII, 906-962. This résumé contained most of the official despatches and correspondence relating to Lille, but omitted all mention of the part played by Maret.
§
Fox and Sheridan were still absenting themmelves from Parliament.
Ibid., 979.
Ibid., 987-1025. Pitt was disturbed and chagrined by a preceding speech by Earl Temple, Buckingham's son and Grenville's nephew, who, posing as an independent, rejoiced that the negotiation had been broken off, and approved "of those measures which have been taken, when we were in the scrape, to extricate us from it" (p.995). This had importance solely because of Temple's relationship with Grenville, and Pitt devoted a good part of his own speech to denying that any such measures had been taken.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Influence of Grenville on Pitt's Foreign Policy, 1787-1798
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 80

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.