Ennead III.6: On the Impassivity of the Bodiless

By Plotinus; Barrie Fleet | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

PLOTINUS THE PLATONIST

Plotinus spent his later years in Rome during the second half of the third century AD. The details of this period of his life are well documented, especially in the biographical sketch of him written by his pupil Porphyry, which often prefaces modern editions of the Enneads. Porphyry tells us something about Plotinus' writings, which he himself edited and published some thirty years after Plotinus' death in AD 270, and in particular about the philosophical seminars which Plotinus held in Rome. What Porphyry does not tell us, however, is how he viewed Plotinus' place in the already long Greek philosophical tradition. All he offers is a quotation from Plotinus' contemporary Longinus: 'He [ Plotinus], as it seems, gave the principles of Plato and Pythagoras a clearer exposition than anyone before him'.1 Augustine was in no doubt of Plotinus' philosophical standing, claiming that 'in Plotinus Plato is brought back to life'.2 But modern scholarship is more equivocal. Most are agreed that Plotinus was one of the great thinkers of the past; P. Henry describes him as 'the last great philosopher of antiquity',3 J. Whittaker as 'the greatest thinker between Aristotle and Descartes',4 and E. R. Dodds says that 'the collected philosophical essays of Plotinus constitute a nodal point in the evolution of Western ideas'.5

Thereafter opinions diverge. P. Merlan gives the impression in the earlier chapters of The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy6 that Plotinus was neither as original nor as important a thinker as some scholars claim. J. Dillon presents a very different picture from that of Merlan; in his book

____________________
1
Porphyry: Vita Plotini 20.
2
Contra Academicos 3. 18.
3
Introduction to Plotinus: The Enneads, trans. by S. MacKenna and ed. J. Dillon (Harmondsworth, 1991) p. xlii. I refer to this edition of the MacKenna translation rather than the fourth edition (rev. B. S. Page ( London, 1969)), since it is more accessible to the interested reader, although certain of the treatises are omitted.
4
The Neoplatonists ( Cambridge, 1901), 33.
5
The Ancient Concept of Progress ( Oxford, 1973), 126.
6
Ed. A. H. Armstrong ( Cambridge, 1967).

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ennead III.6: On the Impassivity of the Bodiless
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Sigla xxiii
  • Codices xxiv
  • Text and Translation 1
  • Synopsis 58
  • Commentary 71
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index Locorum 305
  • Index 312
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.