Cubism: A History and an Analysis, 1907-1944

By John Golding | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
PICASSO, BRAQUE AND GRIS 1912-14

In 1911 Picasso and Braque were joined in their creation of Cubism by a third painter, the Spaniard Juan Gris. Gris has, in a sense, no real history before this. Younger than Picasso and Braque by some five years, Gris arrived in Paris in 1906 at the age of nineteen. Knowing no one there, he sought out Picasso, and soon he installed himself in the same studio building in the rue Ravignan. In Spain Gris had begun to work as a commercial illustrator, and he continued to do so for several years in Paris, but, finding himself in the midst of a creative and original circle of people, he soon began to take his work more seriously. Apart from the commercial work only a few examples of Gris' earliest works are known. These are drawings and gouaches executed in a tight, refined, highly decorative, art nouveau style. By 1910, however, he had begun to work simultaneously in a more straightforward, naturalistic way, and by 1911 he was painting in oils. On January 1st, 1912, Paris Journal announced that some fifteen of his pictures were on show at Clovis Sagot's gallery. A few months later, in March, Gris made his début at the Salon des Indépendants with three canvases, one of which was an Hommage à Picasso (Pl. 43), and during the year he contributed to three exhibitions of Cubist painting.1 After showing at the Section d'Or he signed an exclusive contract with Kahnweiler and, like Picasso and Braque, stopped showing his work publicly.

Gris became familiar with the art of Picasso just as it was entering its most crucial stage, that is to say in the months before he began the Demoiselles d', Avignon. Gris was an intelligent and intensely serious and thoughtful young man, and must have followed the development of Picasso's Cubism step by step, so that when he began to paint seriously in 1911 he might have been expected

____________________
1
At the Galeries Dalmau, Barcelona, 20 April-10 May 1912; Société de Peinture Moderne, Rouen, 15 June-15 July 1912. La Section d'Or, October 1912.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cubism: A History and an Analysis, 1907-1944
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 6
  • Abbreviation 6
  • Illustrations 7
  • Introduction 15
  • Chapter I - The History and Chronology of Cubism 19
  • Chapter II - Picasso and Braque 1907-12 47
  • Chapter III - Picasso, Braque and Gris 1912-14 96
  • Chapter IV - The Influence of Cubism in France 1910-14 138
  • Conclusion 181
  • Bibliography 188
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.