The Story Factor: Secrets of Influence from the Art of Storytelling

By Annette Simmons | Go to book overview

5
The Psychology of
Story's Influence

True places are not found on maps.

HERMAN MELVILLE

Shiva and Parvati, the Hindu god and goddess, were exasperated with their sons, Ganesh and Maruha, who constantly competed for their attention. Ganesh was chubby and cute with his elephant head and big ears. Maruha was sleek and charming. He displayed a sensual beauty uncommon in one so young. Each would sneak into their parents' presence and whine, "Am I your favorite son?" until Shiva bellowed, "Enough! We will settle this -- but you must promise to question us no more." The boys agreed. Shiva and Parvati cleverly devised a test that would not only allow one son to emerge as the favorite but might deliver some peace and quiet in the process. They called the boys

-105-

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The Story Factor: Secrets of Influence from the Art of Storytelling
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - The Six Stories You Need to Know How to Tell 1
  • 2 - What is Story? 27
  • 3 - What Story Can Do That Facts Can't 49
  • 4 - How to Tell a Good Story 83
  • 5 - The Psychology of Story's Influence 105
  • 6 - Sound Bite or Epic? 133
  • 7 - Influencing the Unwilling, Unconcerned, or Unmotivated 157
  • 8 - Storylistening as a Tool of Influence 181
  • 9 - Storyteller Dos and Don'ts 199
  • 10 - The Life of a Storyteller 219
  • Storytelling in Action - What Impact Do You Want to Have on the World? 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 247
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