Splintered Reflections: Images of the Body in Trauma

By Jean Goodwin; Reina Attias | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the contributors, who as we worked on this project invariably supplied, in addition to the requested chapters, more intricate gifts including clinical sharing, mutual consultations, long conversations over wonderful meals, scenic walks and many other manifestations of welcome and sustenance.

Our thanks go as well to the American Psychiatric Association for accepting as an Annual Meeting Symposium ( New York City, May 1996) a presentation previewing early versions of Chapters 1, 3, 10 and 11. Early versions of Chapters 4 and 5 were presented in a symposium at the 1996 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Traumatic Stress ( Jerusalem, June 1996). The Institute of Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch sponsored a colloquium at which an early draft of Chapter 12 was reviewed. Chapters 6 and 7 are based on papers presented at annual meetings of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation ( Chicago, 1994, and Orlando, Florida, 1995). Chapters 3 and 9 developed in part from presentations at the Eastern Regional Meetings on Trauma and Dissociation ( Alexandria, Virginia, 1993, 1994).

Participants at those meetings and many others helped us absorb and digest this material and think about it more clearly. Olga Heijtmaier ( Amsterdam) helped us understand the cross-cultural validity of the tree-drawing task (Chapter 9) and its value as a clue to the presence of cryptic forms of dissociation even when other clinical and psychological test indicators are absent. Brett Kahr ( London) gave us his brilliant biography of D. W. Winnicott, which we deployed in the theoretical summaries in Chapter 10, and also introduced us to Valerie Sinason. Rudi Binion ( Boston) reviewed Chapter 12, and in the preconceptualization phase of trying to write about metamorphosis, Teresita McCarty ( Albuquerque) gave clarifying advice, as did all the members of the Advanced Candidates Class at the Houston-Galve-

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