No Magic Bullet: A Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880

By Allan M. Brandt | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Alfred Crosby, Epidemic and Peace ( Westport, Connecticut, 1976). On the devastating impact of infectious disease see also, William H. McNeill, Plagues and Peoples ( New York, 1976).
2.
The fullest exposition of the now considerable debate on the cause of the decline of mortality and the rise of population is Thomas McKeown, The Role of Medicine ( Princeton, 1980). McKeown argues, quite convincingly, that mortality had fallen substantially before modern medicine could effectively address most infectious diseases. See also Thomas McKeown, "A Historical Appraisal of the Medical Task", in McKeown and Gordon McLachlan, eds., Medical History and Medical Care, ( London, 1971), 29- 50; T. McKeown and R. G. Record, "Reasons for the Decline of Mortality in England and Wales During the Nineteenth Century", in M. W. Flinn and T. C. Smout, Essays in Social History ( Oxford, 1974), 218-50; Edward Meeker, "The Improving Health of the United States, 1850-1915", Explorations in Entrepreneurial History 9 ( Summer 1972): 353-73; and Peter Mathias, "Disease, Medicine, and Demography in Britain During the Industrial Revolution", Annales Cisalpines d'Histoire Sociale 2 ( 1973): 1045-84.

On the impact of modern therapuetics see Harry F. Dowling, Fighting Infection: Conquests of the Twentieth Century ( Cambridge, 1977); and Paul B. Beeson "Changes in Medical Therapy During the Past Half Century", Medicine 59 ( 1980): 79-85.

3.
"STD Fact Sheet-1980" ( Washington: DHHS, 1981); and New York Times, January 23, 1977.
4.
In the last two decades, studies of cholera, pellagra, and hookworm have deepened our understanding of disease in its social context. See Charles E. Rosenberg, "The Cholera Years" ( Chicago, 1962); Elizabeth W. Etheridge, The Butterfly Caste ( Westport, Connecticut, 1972); and John Ettling, The Germ of Laziness, ( Cambridge, 1981).
5.
On the history of the American medical profession and issues of professionalization see Paul Starr, The Social Transformation of American Medicine ( New York, 1982); Burton Bledstein, The Culture of Professionalism ( New York, 1976); Jeffrey Berlant, Profession and Monopoly: A Study of Medicine in the United States and Great Britain ( Berkeley, 1975); Bernard Barber, "Some Problems in the Sociology of the Professions", in Kenneth Lynn, ed., The Professions in America ( Boston, 1965), 15-34; Rosemary Stevens , American Medicine and the Public Interest ( New Haven, 1971); and Martin S.Pernick

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