Appendix

A Selection of Rastafarian Poetry

Poetry is one way in which the Rastafarians have been able to convey their messages to the wider world. The earliest poets used themes dominated by the Back-to-Africa ethos. In these poems, their hero, Marcus Garvey received a prominent place. Following this, reggae songs appeared. This musical phase, although retaining elements of the messianic-millenarian theme, began to focus more on the conditions experienced by the Rastafarians in Jamaica. Along with this new sorrow-songs type, a poetry also developed around African liberation themes. In the following selections we shall deal only with those of the first and third types. Much of the Rastafarian songs are now on records, the printing of which would demand clearance from record companies. These printed here were gathered in field research and are not yet under copyright laws. Many of these would have been lost to us in a very short while. Some date back to 1968, while others are only of very recent date.


A Rhyme for the Times

The following poem appeared in the Daily Gleaner of August 4, 1960, in a column written by Thomas Wright under

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rastafarians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Paradise Island 1
  • 2 - Domination and Resistance in Jamaican History 29
  • 3 - Ethiopianism in Jamaica 68
  • 4 - Beliefs, Rituals, and Symbols 103
  • 5 - An Ambivalent Routinization 146
  • 6 - Dissonance and Consonance 167
  • 7 - After Selassie: The Rastafarians Since 1975 210
  • 8 - Where Go the Rastafarians? 248
  • Afterword 267
  • Appendix 271
  • Notes 281
  • Bibliography 295
  • Index 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.